Conflict between wolves and ranchers touches issues of conservationism and Native American rights- ABC News

protect yellowstone wolves, protect the wolves, sacred resource protection zone

Yellowstone and Teton Wolves need a Miracle in 2018, Join Us to make it Happen!

A series of legislation and proposed legislation in Western states has advocates of wolf conservation concerned for the future of the animal as well as the country’s respect for Native American rights, according to an advocate who spoke to ABC News.

“Wolves are our sacred animals,” said Roger Dobson, founder of the non-profit religious organization Protect the Wolves, and a member of Washington state’s Cowlitz Tribe. “Our creators put wolves on the planet to perform a sacred task. [These laws] encourage people to treat them like vermin.”

The laws and proposed laws to which Dobson is referring include a ruling by a federal appeals court last Friday that wolves in Wyoming should be stripped of Endangered Species Act federal protections.

Gray wolves were once hunted to the brink of extinction in the lower 48 states, but they recovered under Endangered Species Act protections and reintroduction programs, according to The Associated Press.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says gray wolves now number around 5,500, including about 400 in Wyoming. Officials in Wyoming determined in 2012 that gray wolves were no longer a threatened species.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson sided with environmental groups in 2014, ruling that a promise made by Wyoming to maintain a population above the minimum 100 wolves, including 10 breeding pairs, outside of Yellowstone National Park and the Wind River Indian Reservation was unenforceable, which led to the appeal.

Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming welcomed Friday’s ruling, saying that the state should decide how best to handle its wolf population.

“This ruling will again put the process of managing the gray wolf back where it belongs — in Wyoming’s capable hands,” Cheney said.

Cheney, a Republican, has fought against the federal regulation of wolves, and has cited the rights of ranchers to protect their livestock as a reason for backing the appeal.

“It’s a bipartisan issue. We see what’s happened with the wolf population [and] we see the damage that’s being done, particularly for our ranchers,” she told KGAB radio in Wyoming earlier this year.

Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead, who is also a Republican, released a statement praising the ruling on Friday.

“I am pleased with today’s ruling. The court recognized Wyoming’s Wolf Management Plan was appropriate. We look forward to state management once the 2012 delisting rule is formally reinstated. I thank everyone who has worked so hard for the recovery and delisting of wolves. This is the right decision for wolves and Wyoming,” Mead said.

Dobson and other activists see the ruling as favoring the ranchers. According to Dobson, the legislation will allow ranchers to shoot the animals, who are still in danger of disappearing, on sight.

Rebecca Riley, an attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, one of the plaintiffs, told the AP the court’s decision was “a step backwards for wolf recovery in the West.”

 

Source: Conflict between wolves and ranchers touches issues of conservationism and Native American rights – ABC News http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/GrizzlyandWolf-750×432.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Wyoming Game and Fish seeks public input

Protect yellowstone wolves, protect the wolves

Yellowstone and Teton Wolves need proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”

Wyoming needs to hear We are tired of them managing our Federal Resources under the influence of Hunters and Ranchers before there are no Wildlife left for Our Children to enjoy. They need to once again hear about Our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”. We will be personally calling Director Talbott and again requesting a Meeting with the Tribal Groups that we assembled for his canceled meeting.

Wyoming has proven time and time again not being fit to manage the Public’s Resources. From backing out of meetings to getting caught selling “Outlawed” poisons, to disrespecting Native American Religious Rights by calling our Sacred Species “Vermin”.

Wyoming needs to Hear from Us !!

Comments and suggestions can be submitted in an online forum today and start commenting on important issues to you. The forum is accessible at wgfd.wyo.gov under the ‘get involved’ tab

CHEYENNE—The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is seeking public input as it embarks on a major project to chart a path for the future of Wyoming’s wildlife.

People can offer comments on wildlife and the Game and Fish Department as part of a major research study to develop a new agency-wide strategic plan.

Public input will help shape the first-of-its-kind strategic plan that the Game and Fish plans to use for years to come, according to a press release.

“This is your chance to drive the future of Wyoming’s wildlife,” said Scott Talbott, director of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “An opportunity like this does not come around very often and we hope you will take advantage of it and give us your thoughts on the future of wildlife, hunting, fishing and our agency.”

Comments and suggestions can be submitted in an online forum today and start commenting on important issues to you. The forum is accessible at wgfd.wyo.gov under the ‘get involved’ tab. Visitors will be able to post comments on the website until June, 2018.

In February there will be a series of in-person events where the public can comment. There will also be a telephone survey of residents and nonresidents.

Game and Fish will build the strategic plan between March and June of 2018. The agency has partnered with Responsive Management, a survey research firm specializing in capturing and analyzing public opinions toward natural resources and outdoor recreation, and The Cooperation Company, a firm specializing in strategic and operational planning, for this project.

“Our mission is to conserve wildlife and to serve the public. We believe this project will help us do both even better,” Talbott said.

As the agency leading wildlife management in Wyoming, the Game and Fish manages more than 800 species of fish and wildlife across Wyoming.

Source: Wyoming Game and Fish seeks public input | News | rocketminer.com http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/wfg-1.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

And Hunters wonder why the Yellowstone Elk herds are disappearing? DUH

Look People, it truly isnt Rocket Science, when you slaughter the Cows, there is nothing left for breeding. This Cow was killed just outside of Yellowstone National Park. Wyoming Fish and Game need to pull their Heads out and stop hunting Period. This is but 1 of the many Prime Examples of why Wyoming has no Business managing Wildlife Period. The Way they manage our Public Resources, We will have no wildlife Period left for our Children’s Children to enjoy in Yellowstone.

This Particular Hunter even admits it was the most foolish shot hed ever taken… Sounds more like he merely pointed at the Herd and Shot!

 

Excerpts from the Story:

On Sunday, Dec. 3, Casey Johnson came to our Meeteetse, Wyoming motel room. He would be my guide for the next three days on the cow elk hunt I had booked with Wood River Outfitters. Casey would prove to be strong, athletic, and extremely knowledgeable when it came to elk behavior.

During our pre-hunt motel room session, I learned that the Yellowstone herd — 2,000 to 3,000 of them — was wintering on Carter Mountain, part of the Absaroka Range. The elk were hopefully on the flat beneath the mountain, and in all likelihood, a cow elk would stand and look at me from 65 yards. Casey would be back at 6 a.m. to pick up Mike Hall and me in his quad cab Chevy.

Without thinking, I picked out a cow on the inside edge and followed her in my scope’s crosshairs. I swung a foot ahead and touched the trigger. When the herd cleared, a dead cow lay in the trodden snow. That shot was the most foolish I’ve ever taken in my life, as the consequences could have been disastrous. I was darn lucky.

 

Source: Wiltz: Luck was on my side in Wyoming | The Daily Republic http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/12RUDuQEk4QdIe531DttdF_3SnOmvTcbC.jpg #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Object to and oppose extending cattle grazing in the Upper Green, (36-CFR 218.7) Project 3049.

Speakout against grizzly delisting

Object to and oppose extending cattle grazing

in the Upper Green

Your Page clearly stated all Objections emailed by the 8th of January 2018.
 

ATTENTION: Dave Booth
Pinedale Ranger District
29 East Fremont Lake Rd. P.O. Box 220, Pinedale, WY, 82941
[email protected]

 

David Booth and Objection Reviewing Officer:

 

Dear Sirs, This is a formal request to add me to list of concerned Citizens who are to be contacted with regard to the scoping of such projects as the Upper Green Grazing Project.

 

Please put me on your list of citizens to inform of any and all other NEPA projects now and future considered in the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

 

Protect The Wolves™ Sanctuary A Native American 501c3

Patricia Herman President

Roger Dobson Director

208-571-0520

 

Further  We would like our comment filed and considered in this FEIS process, it was emailed on the 8th per your page.

 

The National Forest while managed by the Department of Agriculture is forest management in the public trust for all Wyoming Citizens, US Forest Service comes under the aspect of All Peoples, Native American as well as the entire Public of the USA.. I object to a few wealthy landowners, Ranchers and politicians controlling the riparian areas of the upper green.

 

We have friends and Volunteers that have ridden horseback through the cattle allotments in the Upper Green on numerous occasions, it is beyond disturbing to observe and not fun. The cattle are very aggressive. They have charged our friends horses, They are all over the willows in the river bottom, where a cow and calf moose of which we have far too few cannot compete. I am also commenting on the pollution factor of the water. There is currently case law that establishes Water Protection in Riparian Areas, Case Law already establishes that it need not even be within Reservation Boundaries. Cattle deposit excrement as well as Urine in the water systems which makes it unfit for human consumption as well as spreads disease to other Animals. in riparian areas. – Livestock tend to spend a disproportionate amount of time in and near riparian areas, that cause further degradation, which is not correctable with cattle in those areas. Cattle need to be kept from those Riparian areas to insure that our water quality remains good for all parties involved including wildlife.

 

The reality is the cattle are all through the riparian areas at the detriment of the wildlife and really at the detriment of many recreational users of the forest.

 

We further would like to enter an extremely stern objection to your proposed forage utilization of 60% in uplands and 65% in riparian/meadow areas and all other allotments. This amount of overgrazing leaves nothing present for our Children’s Wildlife Resources. You are thereby creating further problems by allowing this amount of consumption in areas that are feeding areas to Ungulates. If you remove the Ungulates food in the summer, they have nothing to feed on through the winter causing lower lying Ranchers issues when those very same ungulates travel to seek out sustenance, which the creator placed within our National Forests for their own explicit use.

 

Further it is neither appropriate nor acceptable to allow the use of our forest and make it a cattle first, and other forest users beware, land use. It is Wildlife, Environment and Public use rights first as per the Wyoming Constitution, US Forest Service Grazing Allotments are to be protected for the entire Public which includes all peoples in the USA. These rights are further protected for the Indigenous as well as the Public under the Indian as well as Public Trusts.

 

I object to the continued cattle grazing in the Upper Green, and also because, the elk reduction in the Bridger Teton National Forest has resulted in a drastic loss of natural food source for Our Sacred Grizzly Bear, Wolves, and other carnivores.

 

We see that as the National Forest Continues to participate with the WGFD and even with the GTNP in the reduction of our Jackson and other elk herds our carnivores pay a huge price, Humans have no business attempting to manage Mother Natures life forms and using cattle as chum for Predators in the national forest needs to come to a close.

 

With cattle present, all of our wildlife’s resources depleted at the levels that you are prescribing, the game will be drastically reduced if not gone, which when predators fill the void created by the cattle is their demanded slaughter by Ranchers. The cattle should not be in the forest period. The Old West Mentality that Cattlemen believe they have the right to kill all carnivores essentially on sight and I have read every mortality report of the Grizzly Bear in the upper green 1988 to 2014 and know bear are shot by the ranchers and it does not take a seasoned criminal defense attorney to see that fact.

 

These cattle operations do not respect the balance of nature required to operate within the the Publics National forests. If the cattle are allowed in the forest the rules to protect the other wildlife must be strict. Limit the cattle use of the riparian, willowed areas, by creating strict buffer zones, require dogs, protecting the cattle on site at all times to deter predators. Require range riders to protect the cattle and to remove all dead cattle immediately so there can be no chumming of predators to the cattle. Cattlemen are not allowed to kill apex predators, Grizzly Bear and wolves, WGFD is required to manage and record these incidents, by regulations still lacking for grizzly bear management at the state level.

 

For these reasons and additional which would have been detailed had I been included in the scoping as requested previously I object to and oppose extending cattle grazing in the Upper Green, (36-CFR 218.7) Project 3049.

  http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/GrizzlyandWolf.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Yellowstone and Teton Wolves need a Miracle in 2018

You can be part of that very Miracle that we are speaking of.

Yellowstone and Teton Wolves need a Miracle in 2018

Wyoming has needlessly Slaughtered 44 possible Park Wolves 76 in all since season opened Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 photo credit: RJ PiskoREDDING, CA – 01/04/2017 (PRESS RELEASE JET) — Americans have continually taken for granted their right to exterminate any creature that poses a danger, ever since they first arrived on Turtle Island. They annihilated the Buffalo to try to starve out the Native Americans, placed bounties on wolves, and other predators that they have decided they did not want to remain competing with.

Our Sacred Yellowstone and Teton Wolf brothers are being ruthlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, which is only the first species. If We allow the greedy Elected Officials and State Agencies to continue to be influenced by Special Interest Livestock Lobby, Our Sacred Grizzly Brother will be next. As of December 31st, 76 total wolves, 44 of which could have been possible National Park Resources along with 32 others have been needlessly slaughtered. Wyoming continues to disrespect and ignore Our Religious Beliefs by calling our Sacred Wolves “Vermin”.

Earlier this year Protect The Wolves™ petitioned Wyoming Game and Fish to change Hunting Regulations as well as establish a  “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” surrounding National Parks along with changing their hunting regulations to not allow baiting, night time hunting with spotlights, along with making it illegal to shoot a collared wolf. Collaring Wolves like Elk is very expensive, and taxpayers end up footing the bill.

Wyoming Game and Fish Director Scott Talbott agreed to a meeting with Protect The Wolves™ Pack,  and the Tribal Groups that we had assembled, along with Western Watersheds Project Director Erik Molvar. The Rocky Mtn Dept of Justice helped to set up the meeting. 3 days before the face to face meeting was to happen, Wyoming Game and Fishes Director Scott Talbott canceled, stating “He only wanted to meet with Director Roger Dobson with Protect The Wolves™ Pack.

Needless to say the Regulation Petition to WGF fell on deaf ears, further they did not give any weight to the over 400,000 signatures collected by Dr. Tony Povilitis of Campaign for Yellowstones Wolves, who had asked to accompany our Regulation Petition with his signatures.

The only language that Wyoming Game and Fishes Director will understand will be that coming from a Judge.

If you enjoy seeing Yellowstone Wolves It is now more imperative than ever that we come together to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding our National Parks. Join us Today to become the Howl that will be heard around the World, and begin righting the wrongs created by special interest influence from  the Livestock Industry once and for all! We will begin putting 1 state in Court Every Single Month as soon as 57,500 of Our Facebook followers become part of the Miracle and join the Howl.

Protect The Wolves™ is a Native American 501c3

 

read the story here: https://pressreleasejet.com/news/yellowstone-and-teton-wolves-need-a-miracle-in-2018.html https://pressreleasejet.com//uploads/newsreleases/yellowstone-and-teton-wolves-need-a-miracle-in-2018.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Wyoming Hunters have Slaughtered 44 possible Park Wolves 76 altogether to Date

protect yellowstone wolves, protect Teton wolves, protect the wolves, sacred resource protection zone

 

POSSIBLE YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE BEING SLAUGHTERED!!!

AS OF 12/30/2017 at 3pm

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in the Blood thirsty state of Wyoming a total of it appears 76 wolves altogether 44 from the Trophy Zone, 32 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State!

Wyoming is over Quota in 3 Zones surrounding Yellowstone National Park already, and has proven once again that they are incapable of managing the Publics Federal Resources as well as our Sacred Species properly. They chose to ignore the public comment regarding Regulation Changes and establishing our Sacred Resource Protection Zone Voluntarily. THEY NEED TO BE TAKEN TO COURT!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member so We are able to call these blood thirsty states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 57,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold! Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

We asked for your support back in May to Help Yellowstone Wolves with our Sacred Resource Protection Zone…  Wolves are dying, crying out for us to help them. http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/1230slaughter-750×718.png #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

In the 1980s and 1990s  the state of Montana conducted its elk reduction near Gardiner, Montana

The number of wapiti on Yellowstone’s northern range today is closer to 6,000 which move seamless in and out of the park, and there are actually far fewer wolves in the park now than a decade ago. a Decade ago Ranchers were complaining there were too many Elk so Montana Slaughtered them All not Wolves.
In the coming months, Yellowstone National Park, as part of the Interagency Bison Management Plan adopted with the state of Montana in 2000, intends to reduce the current size of the park’s bison herd from around 4,800 to between 3,900 and 4,200.
Last winter 1,200 bison were removed—the largest reduction in a decade—with more than half sent to slaughter and nearly 500 killed by hunters. Nine of every ten Yellowstone bison that died were killed beyond the park’s northern border in the Upper Yellowstone River Valley. The goal, park officials say, is to eventually reduce the number of bison to between 3,000 and 3,500.
Since the mid 1980s, more than 10,400 of the Yellowstone icons have been killed for wandering into Montana based on the now-debunked premise that they represent imminent threats of passing the disease brucellosis to domestic cattle. Critics say the “hunting” of park bison is anything but a sporting proposition; most animals are accustomed to people and do not flee.
The question is not only why more bison continue to be slaughtered or placed in quarantine, but also what are the consequences of removing animals that are merely acting upon ancient biological instincts to escape deep snow at higher elevations and move to lower-lying grasslands outside the park?
° ° °

 

To be clear, the following parallel drawn between bison and elk is not intended to be a blanket anti-hunting statement. However, it has been asserted by government wildlife officials I’ve spoken with that when hunters opened fire on elk migrating out of Yellowstone across its northern border into Montana this fall, and for those who formed a firing line shooting at elk sprinting for their lives across Grand Teton National Park, there was no sophisticated selection or discrimination going on related to which animals were being felled.

 

Quite the opposite.

 

During those years in the late 1980s and 1990s when the state of Montana conducted its elk reduction near Gardiner, Montana to dramatically reduce the number of wapiti on Yellowstone’s northern range, late season elk hunts were held in which pregnant cow elk were killed. Thousands of elk were eliminated and veteran sportsmen I knew called the scene the antithesis of ethical hunting.

 

People forget—especially those who hate wolves—that before wolves were restored in the mid 1990s, many of those same individuals lobbed a fusillade of criticisms at Yellowstone, claiming the park was mismanaged and the northern range grossly overgrazed by 19,000 elk.

 

Moreover, they either forget or deny that wolves, in reducing elk numbers, have produced a number of ecological dividends. Though there is widespread dispute over whether there has been a full-blown “trophic cascade effect”, having fewer elk has dramatically changed the way the landscape is being used.
The number of wapiti on Yellowstone’s northern range today is closer to 6,000 which move seamless in and out of the park, and there are actually far fewer wolves in the park now than a decade ago. In recent years, bison have become more numerous. Some now claim, including Yellowstone, that the park’s northern rangelands hold too many bison.

 

While wolves have received much of the blame for fewer elk, no intense analysis has ever been done on the ripple effects caused by humans, poised along the park border in Montana, killing so many female elk of prime reproductive age; no analysis has been done on what the removal of big elk bulls has meant to the gene pool or even what effect those factors had on leaving elk in a better position—or worse—in being able to fend off predation by wolves.
Bison herd with calves in Lamar Valley; NPS / Neal Herbert
Bison herd with calves in Lamar Valley; NPS / Neal Herbert

 

Similarly, it’s reasonable to ask, what effect has the indiscriminate, non-selective slaughter of more than 10,000 Yellowstone bison wandering into Montana, killed under the dubious premise that they represent an ominous risk of brucellosis transmission to private cattle herds, had on the health of the park’s bison herd? As many wonder aloud, how have the killing fields in Montana, along both the park’s northern and western boundaries, affected the social dynamics of Yellowstone’s bison?

 

Bison moving out of the park carry with them an age-old, deeply-engrained instinct—to migrate. What does it mean to continuously remove those animals which are only following their evolutionary drive to leave higher elevation areas inundated by heavy snows in winter, seeking instead better places to feed on grass at lower elevations? How has snuffing out this instinct, by slaughtering bison in mass, contributed to the current problem of so many bison now congregated on Yellowstone’s northern range and causing some perceived overgrazing problems?

 

° ° °

 

Yellowstone today finds itself boxed-in by the state of Montana. Yellowstone officials have said that in order to preserve the ecological and genetic integrity of park bison a minimum of between 3,000 and 3,500 needs to be maintained across decades. Yellowstone and its mountain setting, however, is actually not a place where bison would naturally choose of their own accord to congregate.
Many of Yellowstone’s bison are descended from just 26 wild survivors that found refuge in the park during the late 19th century when a species that once numbered between 30 million and 60 million was reduced to mere hundreds. Yellowstone became a safe harbor because of its geographic remoteness. Survivors of near extinction—the equivalent of a biological holocaust perpetuated on them—conservationists and indigenous people argue that Yellowstone’s bison herds deserve to therefore be treated with special, almost sacred, status.

 

Yellowstone northern range has been compared to a mini-American Serengeti for the diversity of large wild mammals that move across it. One partial antidote, a way to address to some of those bison grazing concerns instead of keeping the animals bottled up in the park, would be opening up more space outside Yellowstone. But the state of Montana has historically refused and only recently, owed to growing public pressure, has it been willing to consider offering bison greater flexibility to be bison.

 

Expecting any wild animal to remain contained behind an invisible human line drawn on a map that does not conform to the biological need of the species defies not only logic but the laws of nature. It may be what ranchers do with non-native livestock, by stringing barbed wire and pasturing animals bred to be docile, but wildlife biologists say it has no grounding in sound 21st-century ecology, ethical treatment or respect for a beloved national symbol that is on the seal of the U.S. Interior Department.

 

Notably, bison are the only species in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem that are not allowed to naturally migrate or roam. Elk and mule deer can, so too pronghorn and moose, trumpeter swans and fish. Montana’s intolerance of bison cannot, with any semblance of truth, be based upon the threat of brucellosis so what is the real reason?.

 

Brucellosis is a serious, highly-contagious zoonotic disease and in bovine animals involves a bacteria Brucella abortus. In the past, it was considered more a health threat to humans who drank unpasteurized milk. In wildlife and livestock, B. abortus does not cause animals to die nor is it population limiting. It is more of a trade issue with barriers put up against states that have brucellosis in their livestock herds. In female animals, be they bison, elk or cattle, it causes pregnant mothers to abort their first calves but generally does not affect reproduction afterwards. For 40 years, it was thought that bison represented the greatest threat of transmission.

 

“During my time in Yellowstone, I have watched with great interest — and some amazement — that bison are vilified as the primary threat or vector for brucellosis transition in the ecosystem,” Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk wrote in the peer-reviewed book Yellowstone Bison: Conserving an American Icon in Modern Society. “There is an illusory belief that if brucellosis were eliminated in bison it would be eliminated from the ecosystem. The authors [in this book] clearly state that this scenario is unlikely and that bison make up a small portion of the overall risk for brucellosis transmission to cattle.”

Source: The Killing Fields Await Yellowstone Bison Once Again http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/ic_1513332776_780x_false.jpg #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #StopTheWolfCull #WolvesInYellowstone

Western Montana hunters enjoy good elk, whitetail season contrary to their fairytales

It gets old listening to hunters cry that there are no Elk or deer left because of Wolves. They are as bad as ranchers.

Wake Up  Government, it is the Hunters that are decimating the Wildlife not our Native Predators!

Despite uncooperative weather in the final days, the 2017 big game season closed with the highest tallies in four years in Fish, Wildlife & Parks Region 2.

Despite uncooperative weather in the final days, the 2017 big game season closed with the highest tallies in four years in Fish, Wildlife & Parks Region 2.

Montana’s five-week big game hunting season ended Sunday with unseasonably warm winds and patchy snow for tracking. Nevertheless, those who went out in west-central Montana did better than average.

Most of the elk came through the Darby station, where 159 elk amounted to a 14 percent increase over last year. The Bonner station recorded its best success since 2011 with 95 elk. That was also 64 percent better than the 2016 season. Anaconda hunters brought in 46 elk, 59 percent more than last year.

Rebecca Mowry, an FWP wildlife biologist in the Bitterroot Valley, said the numbers here were “pretty average.”

“We had such a strong opening weekend, and then it kind of backed off,” Mowry said. “We need a lot of snow and cold weather to keep the elk moving around, and that didn’t happen.”

Hunters told her they saw elk they couldn’t shoot on private property; a lot of people drove around but didn’t get out of their vehicles; and other hunters reported they shot and missed.

“But there are people who brought out elk they took on public lands,” Mowry said. “For the most part, the harder you hunt the more success you’ll have.”

Deer hunters brought 607 whitetails through check stations at Bonner, Darby and Anaconda. That was 3 percent higher than last year and the highest whitetail count since 2008, according to FWP spokeswoman Vivaca Crowser. All but 100 of those came through the Bonner station.

“We’ve seen a steady climb in whitetail harvest since 2014, which correlates with our sense of a growing population,” said Mike Thompson, FWP Region 2 wildlife manager. “This information is a good check on our thoughts of restoring some antlerless harvest opportunities for the 2018 hunting season.”

Mowry said new regulations in the Bitteroot that only allowed youth hunters to take whitetail does  probably led to fewer successes coming through the game check station in Darby. Only 68 were checked, a steady decrease from 110 taken in 2014.

Mule deer harvest in Region 2 came in 35 percent below last year, with just 77 muleys through all three stations. That’s also the lowest recorded in the past four years. FWP imposed special permit requirements in order to boost mule deer numbers throughout the region.

Overall hunter numbers were down about 8 percent compared to last year. Nevertheless, the 11,115 hunters interviewed during the five weekends of check-station operation tagged 999 animals, which was up 6 percent in 2017 and the best Region 2 success rate in the past four years. FWP game wardens also recorded nine black bears, one moose, three bighorn sheep and two wolves through the Region 2 stations.

None of the wolves passed through the Darby station.

Across the Rocky Mountains, FWP Region 4’s solo check station at Augusta saw normal elk numbers and variable deer success.

“The total elk harvest was 5 percent below the 10-year average,” said Brent Lonner, FWP wildlife biologist. “Similar to other years, the elk harvest this year peaked during the second and third week of the season when snow and cold arrived.”

But mule deer numbers were about 15 percent below the 10-year average. Whitetails were 14 percent above average. All told, the Augusta station recorded 315 elk, 253 mule deer and 341 whitetails.

In northwest Montana’s FWP Region 1, hunter success overall was up to 8.6 percent for 2017, compared to 10.1 percent last year. The six game check stations in the region logged 16,269 hunters.

“The percentage of hunters with white-tailed deer varied greatly depending on where you were hunting,” said Neil Anderson, FWP Region 1 Wildlife Manager. “Overall, hunters seemed to be enjoying themselves despite some challenging conditions. Most of the hunters I spoke to, including those who did not harvest an animal, stated they were having a good and enjoyable season.”

Overall, Region 1 hunters took 1,275 whitetails, 78 elk and 51 mule deer.

 That’s the lowest number of mule deer since records were first kept in 1985, Anderson said.

“We don’t know why the numbers were so low,” Anderson said. “Fortunately, we are initiating a mule deer study in the Fisher River and Whitefish Range in Region 1 this winter. We hope to get valuable information on habitat use, nutrition, and some data on mortality rates.”

Source: Western Montana hunters enjoy good elk, whitetail season | Local News | ravallirepublic.com http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Yellowstone_Wolves-750×509-750×509-1.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInYellowstone

Coexisting with coyotes (and wolves and bears and …) in Illinois 

sacred resource protection zone, protect the wolves, protect wyoming wolves, protect yellowstone wolves

Humans, have taken for granted their right to exterminate any creatures that pose a danger, It is now more imperative than ever that we come together to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding our National Parks. Our Sacred Yellowstone and Teton Wolves are being ruthlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, which is only the first species. If We allow the greedy Politicians to have their way, Our Sacred Grizzly Brother will be next

Fine, and we accept Anchor’s point that there’s never been a documented case of a coyote biting a person in Cook County. But how should we humans react to increasingly frequent encounters with wildlife in this sprawling metropolis?

In Grayslake, police Chief Phil Perlini was confronted with two separate attacks on small dogs by coyotes near the village. This fall, he posted on Facebook that he was in the market for trappers “to control and/or curb the coyote population.”

But like these animals, people are adaptable. “When I posted that very first Facebook post, I didn’t know anything about coyotes,” he told the Daily Herald. “The thought of humanely trapping the coyotes and humanely relocating them was a possibility in my head.”

Give the chief credit for trying to address the problem without bloodshed. But he learned from wildlife experts that catching and moving the critters wouldn’t solve anything. Remove one coyote from a livable area, and another one will jump at the vacancy.

Those relocated stand a good chance of being killed by other coyotes guarding their territory. Some will be hit by cars trying to get back to where they were caught. Killing campaigns don’t work, either, because the surviving coyotes adapt: They tend to breed at younger ages and bear larger litters in response.

“There is no eliminating this problem,” Perlini concluded. “There’s only coexisting.”

There is a lot more coexisting than there used to be. Coyotes have greatly expanded their range and numbers in recent years, making them a frequent sight in many suburbs and also in Chicago, which is believed to have an established population of at least 2,000. They’ve found that residential areas offer plenty of food and sufficient cover to avoid detection.

Living in such places does present them the risk of unwanted encounters, most often involving dogs or cats, though actual attacks by coyotes are rare. Trying to protect pets by getting rid of coyotes, though, is a futile endeavor. It’s much more feasible to take simple precautions — such as not leaving pets outside unattended, not walking dogs without a leash, and not leaving pet food or garbage in places where it might attract coyotes. There are even ways to “coyote-proof” fences.

As wildlife goes, this type is not exceptionally frightening. People in the Southwest have to contend with rattlesnakes, whose bites can be fatal. People in Montana and Wyoming know the deadly capacity of grizzly bears. In Maine, hundreds of cars collide each year with moose, sometimes killing motorists. In recent years, northern Illinois has had occasional visits from mountain lions, wolves and black bears — animals whose ancestors freely roamed these lands.

Humans, who once took for granted their right to exterminate any creatures that pose a danger, increasingly accept their presence as a sensible accommodation with nature. Anyone leery of coyotes might consider that if these small-brained creatures can learn to coexist, we should be able to do the same.

Source: Coexisting with coyotes (and wolves and bears and …) in Illinois – Chicago Tribune http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/dieforgreed-750×521.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

43 Possible YELLOWSTONE Park Wolves Needlessly SLAUGHTERED, 73 total

protect yellowstones wolves, sacred resource protection zone

 

43 Possible Yellowstone Park Wolves Slaughtered in Wyoming 73 Wolves total for the offending state

Together we can establish a Sacred Resource Protection Zone around all National Parks while at the same time putting the Indian and Public Trusts to work protecting your wildlife.

Time is of the essence, every day more park wolves are at risk of losing their life to hunters.

As of December 22nd, 73 wolves altogether 43 from the Trophy Zones around Yellowstone and Teton National Parks 3 of which are already over quota.

We at Protect The Wolves are striving to become THE VOICE that our Wolves, Bison, Grizzlies so desperately need to help insure their safety and continuance of life freely.

With the research that we are doing. We have discovered the necessary tools available to us through the “Indian Trust”. . Tools that no other large NPO has available. With your support, we can stop these crooked politicians and their kill all mentality.

Wolves cannot go to the Capitol to speak for themselves. So with your donation, we can put our lawyers to work by using the Indian Trust and the Public Trust to finally be able to protect our wolves!

We will be able to file our cases in as well as against States and elected federal officials regarding their mandates to operate under DUE PROCESS.

Which will be the beginning of being able to put an end to the slaughter of all things held Sacred.

Please help Protect The Wolves today with your gift.
All donations are appreciated, large or small.
The love behind your donation speaks volumes for the wolves.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work today, before they wipe out the rest of our wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves   http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/12222017slaughter-750×698.png #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone