Surgical and N95 Facemasks 

Announcement: We have signed our Surgical Mask Contract with the Manufacturer. They will also be adding N95 Masks for us as well.

With Our President in the middle of cancer treatment we just payed 34.00 at a local pharmacy for 20 disposable face masks next door to the Infusion center and thought that was way high.

Because We are Nonprofit we  are now offering a pack of 50 for 30.00+ 7.65 1 rate USPS Shipping  after Our Experience at the Pharmacy. Any Proceeds benefit Our Education, Research, Outreach and Legal Programs.

Our Next Shipment will be in approx 4/17/2020

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Our Nonprofit as received several price Quotes for Surgical Masks We are offering the best possible prices that were submitted, and N95 masks as well coming in soon. Call Us at 31zero-four9four-6314

If you would like more information, please use Our FB Chat lower right Corner to pm or Call  Us at 1zero-four9four-6314

We can have 3000 pc lots or greater plus shipping, shipped direct to your address.

If you would like to participate in our sourcing pricing, let Us know, perhaps with larger quantities of 100,000 plus they can offer Us better pricing.
It helps when you work with a Nonprofit, Not only can we find you better prices, We work diligently to Protect Your Children’s Resources.

Do you need products Sourced? Allow Our Nonprofit to work on the sourcing for you. Being a Nonprofit at times gets us access to better pricing.

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Source: Surgical and N95 Facemasks – Protect The Wolves https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Hf26ebbe54ccf49f0bf3bce731a207ef4S.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves

N.W.T. government hoping to shoot wolves by air next week 

This is simply APPALLING!!

‘Under no circumstances’ is successful bidder to release photos or videos to public, government says

The Northwest Territories government is rushing to hire a helicopter and shooter to start killing up to 300 of the wolves preying on declining caribou herds.

The Northwest Territories government is rushing to hire a helicopter and shooter to start killing up to 300 wolves preying on declining caribou herds.

The aerial cull is part of a wolf reduction plan proposed by the N.W.T. and Tłı̨chǫ governments. They want the wolf populations that prey on the Bathurst and Bluenose East caribou herds reduced by up to 80 per cent. An estimated 420 wolves hunt the herds.

Details of the cull are laid out in a request for tenders for a helicopter, pilot and shooter, that the government published Tuesday.

It says a fixed wing aircraft with spotter will fly over the winter ranges of the herds in the territory’s North Slave region and relay global positioning system coordinates of wolves it spots to the shooter and pilot in the helicopter.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources wants the contract to start on Monday and continue for 10 to 20 days. It is currently working on placing 30 satellite collars on wolves that will give their locations in real time.

The tender also reveals the government’s sensitivity to public perception of the cull. It says the successful bidder is not allowed to take any photographs or video with their own equipment and “under no circumstances” can release them to non-government personnel, media or social media sites.

The wolf reduction plan proposed by the N.W.T. and Tłı̨chǫ governments aims to reduce the wolf populations that prey on the Bathurst and Bluenose East caribou herds reduced by up to 80 per cent. (WWF-Canada)

The request for bids on the project closes Friday.

Shooting wolves from helicopters has proven to be an effective way of reducing wolf numbers but there are questions around how humane it is.  A 2015 study of an aerial cull in Alberta concluded that wolves shot from helicopters were not consistently killed humanely.

“Painful injuries and inhumane kills will inevitably occur, even with the hiring of skilled helicopter pilots and proficient shooters,” researchers wrote.

Reluctant acceptance

The cull comes after years of increasing restrictions on the hunting of caribou in the N.W.T., including by Indigenous people who have relied on caribou as their main food source for millennia.

“The elders have always said we have to respect the animals, including the wolves,” Yellowknives Dene First Nation Chief Edward Sangris said. “Hunting them from helicopters is not the best method to carry out. But they also said we have to look into the issue of the reducing caribou herd. If it helps, they’re okay with it, but up to a point.”

Yellowknives Dene First Nation Chief Edward Sangris says elders have told him they’re okay with wolves being killed by helicopter ‘but up to a point.’ (Gabriela Panza Beltrandi/CBC)

Sangris said hunting restrictions and the scarcity of caribou are having a profound impact on his people, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. He said having to turn to store-bought meat is probably hurting their immune systems.

A similar aerial wolf cull that’s been used for five years in northern British Columbia has seen caribou populations shift from declining by 15 per cent each year to increasing by that amount. A biologist from that program said because wolf populations bounce back very quickly, the aerial culling has to continue until the real cause of the caribou decline — habitat disturbance — is addressed.

Sangris is sceptical about the government taking action on that front

“All they do is talk,” he said. “They don’t follow up with any action. Certainly industry is putting pressure on wildlife. We have to consider how much is too much.”

Sangris said climate change and the warmer winters it brings may also be disrupting caribou migration patterns, with more animals wintering above the treeline.

Roads or caribou

The decline of the caribou herds coincides with the rise of diamond mining in the N.W.T. The two biggest mines, Diavik and Ekati, have been operating for more than 20 years. They are located between the Bathurst herd’s calving ground at Bathurst Inlet, Nunavut, and its winter range north of Great Slave Lake.

Source: N.W.T. government hoping to shoot wolves by air next week | CBC News https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/wolf-nwt.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL

$400,000 in Idaho State Funding to Kill Wolves Approved by Lawmakers 

BOISE, ID – An Idaho board responsible for the killing of wolves that attack livestock and other wildlife is a step closer to getting an additional $400,000 in state funding.

The funds were approved in a 26-4 Senate vote on Wednesday. The funding now only needs the approval of Governor Brad Little.

The Idaho Wolf Depredation Control Board is funded by a mix of contributions from livestock producers, Idaho Department of Fish and Game fees and the state’s general fund.

Earlier this week, the Department of Fish and Game reported the conclusion of wolf control actions done during February that removed 17 wolves in the Lolo elk zone north of Highway 12.

Source: $400,000 in Idaho State Funding to Kill Wolves Approved by Lawmakers | Idaho | bigcountrynewsconnection.com https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/1.jpg #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInIdaho

Idaho Fish and Game kills 17 wolves in north-central Idaho 

You know that IDFG used the collars and Data that the courts told them not to!

LEWISTON, Idaho — More than a dozen wolves were killed last month to help curb struggling elk populations in north-central Idaho, wildlife officials said.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game announced Monday it killed 17 wolves in the remote Lolo Zone, the Lewiston Tribune reported. The zone includes part of the Clearwater National Forests and stretches to the Montana state line.

The agency has carried out wolf culling operations in the region for eight of the last nine years, officials said.

“Restoring the Lolo elk population will require continued harvest of black bears, mountain lions and wolves along with wolf control actions,” the agency said in a statement. “The overall objective is not to eliminate wolves but to maintain a smaller, but self-sustaining wolf population in the Lolo Zone to allow the elk population to recover.”

Federally approved plans allow the agency to kill wolves and other predators when they are “causing conflicts with people, or domestic animals, or are a significant, measured factor in deer and elk population declines,” the statement said.

The elk population in the Lolo Zone peaked with about 16,000 in 1989, but it was estimated at 2,000 in 2017 when the herd was last surveyed, agency officials said. Elk populations started to decline before wolves were reintroduced. The decline was blamed on habitat degradation and harsh winters, officials said.

The state began culling wolves in 2011 as a result of declining elk numbers, and it has killed about 14 wolves each year in the Lolo Zone. The agency had previously partnered with the U.S. Wildlife Services for wolf-control measures, but this year, it hired a private contractor that shot the wolves from helicopters.

Environmental groups have argued culling is unethical, unjustified and ineffective.

 

Source: Fish and Game kills 17 wolves in north-central Idaho | ktvb.com https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/575551742_360x203.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #ProtectWolvesInIdaho

New bill will make it easier for the WDFW to target Wolves who kill cattle.

Leave it up to Crooked Joel Kretz to come  up with legislation to kill wolves easier….. Washington States Ethics Committee let him skate by when he encouraged Social Violence when He said that “Dr Robert Wielgus should be quartered up and a piece left in each corner of his District.”

A new bill in the Washington Legislature seeks to help mitigate the threat that some Washington wolves potentially pose to livestock by mandating radio collars for those in “problem packs.”

For years, ranchers have complained that growing wolf populations in northeastern Washington are killing their livestock. The issue can be contentious between ranchers who’ve had their cattle killed by wolves, and those opposed to lethal removal orders of said wolves.

A new bill in the Washington Legislature seeks to help mitigate the threat that some Washington wolves potentially pose to livestock by mandating radio collars for those in “problem packs.”

For years, ranchers have complained that growing wolf populations in northeastern Washington are killing their livestock. The issue can be contentious between ranchers who’ve had their cattle killed by wolves, and those opposed to lethal removal orders of said wolves.

Washington state giving out $350,000 in non-lethal wolf deterrence grants

The bill has 11 co-sponsors and was introduced by Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, reports the Spokesman. It stipulates that the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) “must radio collar at least two wolves in every pack in conflict. The department is encouraged, but not required, to radio collar at least one wolf in every pack in the state that has been confirmed by the department.”

The collars would allow ranchers to track where wolves are and make it easier for the WDFW to target the ones who killed cattle.

In 2019, wolves killed and injured a number of cattle. The WDFW killed several of the offending wolves, which was met with outrage and lawsuits from conservation groups. There was also anger on the part of ranchers who felt that the WDFW hasn’t responded fast enough to the cattle killings.

Threats lead to cancellation of meetings about Washington wolves

A new bill in the Washington Legislature seeks to help mitigate the threat that some Washington wolves potentially pose to livestock by mandating radio collars for those in “problem packs.”

For years, ranchers have complained that growing wolf populations in northeastern Washington are killing their livestock. The issue can be contentious between ranchers who’ve had their cattle killed by wolves, and those opposed to lethal removal orders of said wolves.

Washington state giving out $350,000 in non-lethal wolf deterrence grants

The bill has 11 co-sponsors and was introduced by Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, reports the Spokesman. It stipulates that the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) “must radio collar at least two wolves in every pack in conflict. The department is encouraged, but not required, to radio collar at least one wolf in every pack in the state that has been confirmed by the department.”

The collars would allow ranchers to track where wolves are and make it easier for the WDFW to target the ones who killed cattle.

In 2019, wolves killed and injured a number of cattle. The WDFW killed several of the offending wolves, which was met with outrage and lawsuits from conservation groups. There was also anger on the part of ranchers who felt that the WDFW hasn’t responded fast enough to the cattle killings.

Threats lead to cancellation of meetings about Washington wolves

According to the WDFW, 14 wolves in eight packs are collared, and their lethal policy enables termination if any wolves attack livestock three times in a 30-day period (or four times in a 10-month period), as well as under the condition that two nonlethal deterrents have already been tried.

The bill is supported by the Washington Cattleman’s Association, though environmental groups sent a letter in opposition, arguing that collaring is difficult, poses a danger to the wolves, and is the wrong application of limited resources.

Source: New bill would collar ‘problem’ wolves in Washington state https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-300×200-300×200-300×200-1.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Arizona Wildlife managers investigate deaths of 3 Mexican wolves 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State and federal wildlife managers are investigating the death of three endangered Mexican gray wolves found last month in Arizona.

Officials with the wolf recovery team did not release any details about the circumstances of the animals’ deaths or the specific areas where they were found. One of the wolves was a female that belonged to the Saffel Pack. The other two were single females.

Officials also reported that wolves were found to be responsible for seven livestock kills in January. Two nuisance incidents also were investigated.

A subspecies of the Western gray wolf, Mexican wolves have faced a difficult road to recovery that has been complicated by politics and conflicts with livestock since reintroduction efforts began more than two decades ago in Arizona and New Mexico.

Survey results released last year indicated there were at least 131 wolves in the wild in the two states at the end of 2018. The population count for 2019 is expected to be released in the coming weeks.

Source: Wildlife managers investigate deaths of 3 Mexican wolves | AP CNN | azfamily.com https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/5c1450822cc73.image_.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

High-altitude genes could turn Himalayan wolves into a new species 

Genetic analysis suggests they differ significantly from gray wolves

In the high grasslands of Earth’s tallest mountains lives a group of wolves known for their long snouts, pale woolly pelts, and low-pitched calls. Now, their genes are also setting them apart. A new study suggests these wolves—which range across northern India, China, and Nepal—are genetically distinct from the gray wolves that live nearby, thanks to genes that help them cope with the thin air above 4000 meters.

“This is a very exciting study,” says Ben Sacks, a canine evolutionary ecologist at the University of California, Davis. It “provides the first compelling evidence for the distinctiveness of [the Himalayan] wolf.” The finding supports previous calls for it to be recognized as a separate species, and it also suggests the wolf’s range is twice as large as was thought.

Himalayan wolves live at higher altitudes than grays, which range across eastern China, Mongolia, and Kyrgyzstan, and their habits are different, too. Whereas gray wolves primarily eat rodents, Himalayan wolves add the occasional Tibetan gazelle to the mix. And Himalayans howl their own tune, with cries of a shorter duration and lower frequency than those of grays.

Now, samples of wolf feces collected across the Tibetan Plateau of China, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan provide genetic evidence that it is a different breed. Researchers extracted DNA representing 86 Himalayan wolves from the samples. Analysis showed that, unlike gray wolves, Himalayans carry specialized genes that help them overcome a lack of oxygen, including ones that strengthen the heart and boost the delivery of oxygen through the blood. The adaptations, which the team reports today in the Journal of Biogeography, resemble those of Tibetan people and their dogs (which are believed to have been interbred with Himalayan wolves), and domesticated yaks.

The widespread presence of scat from Himalayan wolves also suggests they are not restricted to the Himalayas, but roam the entire Tibetan Plateau at elevations above 4000 meters.

Together, these findings suggest the high-living wolf should be considered a distinct species—or at least as an “evolutionary significant unit,” the researchers write. And they support previous research suggesting these little-studied canids are the oldest lineage of modern wolves, having diverged from other wolves between 630,000 to 800,000 years ago.

Source: High-altitude genes could turn Himalayan wolves into a new species | Science | AAAS https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Himalayan_wolf_1280x720.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews

Wolves regurgitate blueberries for their pups to eat 

protect the wolves, ban grazing allotments

Gray wolves are known to snack on blueberries, but the animals do more than fill their own bellies. A new, serendipitous observation shows an adult wolf regurgitating the berries for its pups to eat, the first time anyone has documented this behavior.

Wolves have a well-earned reputation as skillful hunters with a taste for large, hoofed ungulates like deer and moose. But scientists are increasingly recognizing that these predators have an exceptionally varied diet, partaking in everything from beavers and fish to fruit.

In 2017, biologist Austin Homkes of Northern Michigan University in Marquette got a sense of just how important this mixed diet could be for wolves. A cluster of signals from a GPS collar on a wolf led Homkes to a meadow just outside Minnesota’s Voyageurs National Park. Homkes, who was studying the animals’ predatory and dietary habits, thought he was headed for a spot where the wolf had killed a meal. But it turned out to be a rendezvous site, with adult wolves bringing food to their no longer den-bound pups.

Scientists are increasingly recognizing that meat-eating wolves have an exceptionally varied diet, noshing even on blueberries. Now a study has shown that the animals regurgitate blueberries to feed to their young. This video shows a 1-year-old male dubbed V081, part of the Sheep Ranch Pack, gobbling berries during the summer of 2019.

Homkes watched from a distance as several pups gathered around an adult wolf, licking up at its mouth. This behavior stimulates adult wolves to throw up a recent meal. Sure enough, the adult began vomiting, and the pups eagerly ate what accumulated on the ground. After the wolves left, Homkes got closer and saw that the regurgitated piles were purely of partially chewed blueberries, he and colleagues report February 11 in the Wildlife Society Bulletin.

“It’s a pretty big part of wolf ecology that was right under our noses that we didn’t see,” Homkes says.

Until now, he and his colleagues thought pups in the region just casually munched on berries while hanging around rendezvous sites, which often contain blueberry plants. The fruit may be an underappreciated food source for the pups, the researchers think.

Conservation biologist Robert Mysłajek of the University of Warsaw says the discovery is an “interesting complement” to our knowledge of the species. “Such observations should be especially important for wildlife managers, who often focus only on wolf-ungulate interactions, forgetting about other food items consumed by wolves,” Mysłajek says.

The findings are generating plenty of questions. Homkes is curious about the nutritional value of blueberries for the mostly carnivorous wolves, and the consequences of a bad berry year. “What happens when blueberries are not available if a pack is used to relying on them?” he wonders.

Source: Wolves regurgitate blueberries for their pups to eat | Science News https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/wpups-300×187-300×187.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews

Wolf vs. Elk: Colorado Complaining

Colorado Hunters slaughter nearly 50,000 Elk per year its reported in Colorado Encyclopedia, and they are complaining what wolves will do? Seriously????

Colorado complaining follows:

Does anyone see the coming conflict with the apparent shrinking number of elk in southwest Colorado, and the reintroduction of wolves?

Increasing bear numbers are part of the problem of fewer calves surviving. Add wolves to that equation and what happens to the elk that are left?

Blaming hunters for a few weeks in the fall does not address the question of year-round predation by these animals that live on deer, elk, livestock, and down to the smaller critters like rabbits.

Whose side are you on?

 

Source: Letters: Wolf vs. Elk: Whose side will you be on? https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-300×200-300×200.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

Wildlife Commission Rejects Expanded Wolf Hunts in Northwest Montana 

 

Is Montana Listening?? A Blessing for Our Sacred Resources in Yellowstone!

Despite a proposal from state wildlife managers to extend the general wolf-hunting and trapping seasons in Montana’s northwest corner while doubling its allowable harvest quota, members of the state Fish and Wildlife Commission on Feb. 13 elected to maintain the current season dates and quotas as spelled out under the 2019 regulations.

The rule-making body also voted to tighten wolf quotas in hunting districts 313 and 316 north of Yellowstone National Park, reducing allowable take from two wolves to one after hearing public comment from wolf advocates who say non-consumptive wildlife viewers deserve a seat at a table increasingly dominated by a vocal minority of hunters who want to see wolf populations decimated.

Speaking during public comment at the rule-making meeting in Helena, former Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Gary Wolfe, of Missoula, said he’s a bit of an anomaly as a hunter who also wants to see healthy wolf populations on the landscape.

Although Wolfe said he supported the current limited harvest quota of one wolf in each of the districts flanking Yellowstone, he bristled at the proposal by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ (FWP) Region 1 officials to expand hunting opportunities in northwest Montana.

“This is not a biological objection but a social one, because the optics of this proposal are terrible,” Wolfe said. “From the perspective of conservation-minded sportsmen, it just isn’t ethical. It doesn’t look good. The perception it sends is that the department is catering to those folks who would like to eliminate wolves from the landscape. I don’t envy the commissioners in that seat right now. These are difficult decisions.”

According to wildlife officials with FWP’s Region 1, whose jurisdiction encompasses Flathead, Lincoln, Sanders, and Lake counties, the proposed changes to the wolf hunting and trapping seasons emerged from the latest biennial season-setting process involving the review of hunting season structures for most game animals and other managed species. FWP regional staff met and took input from local communities at four meetings across northwest Montana this winter. More than 900 public comments were also received online from Dec. 5 to Jan. 27 and forwarded to commissioners and FWP staff for their consideration.

“We heard from a substantial number of people attending the public meetings throughout northwest Montana who requested additional opportunity for wolves,” FWP Regional Wildlife Manager Neil Anderson said. “Biologically, we have the wolf population to sustain additional harvest opportunity and wanted to be responsive to public input and participation.”

The proposed changes included extending the general hunting season to begin Aug. 15 and end March 31 (currently, archery season begins Sept. 1, while general season begins Sept. 15 and ends March 15); extending trapping season to March 15 (currently, it ends Feb. 28); and increasing the individual limit to 10 wolves per person (the current individual limit is five).

Before the commission voted unanimously to maintain the current hunting and trapping regulations for wolves, Commissioner Pat Byorth characterized the proposal as a “pander” that will appease some critics of the state’s wolf management plan but won’t make any real difference on the landscape.

“The Region 1 proposal came late and it’s a sea change. And it’s going to have implications for wolf management in a lot of regions,” Byorth said. “To me wolves are a valued wildlife resource. I want to keep wolves healthy and keep them on the landscape, but this doesn’t do it. This is a pander to other issues. And we are making a change that will do nothing, and it almost makes a promise to people that it will.”

Nick Gevock, conservation director for the Montana Wildlife Federation, said his organization supports wolf-hunting opportunities in the state, adding that wolf populations are healthy with good genetic exchange. However, he said expanding the timeframe to hunt and trap wolves would create conflict with other wildlife, and increase the potential for bycatch, such as grizzly bears inadvertently being trapped.

“The best conservation model is to have hunters on the ground and harvesting within their limits,” Gevock said. “But don’t extend trapping season. Grizzlies are out there and that’s a dangerous situation for the trapper, for the bear and for your staff.”

Source: Wildlife Commission Rejects Expanded Wolf Hunts in Northwest Montana – Flathead Beacon https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/shutterstock_wolf1.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews