When farmers don’t bury dead cows, it affects where and what wolves eat | Michigan Radio

protect michigan wolves, protect the wolves, less depredations

 

When farmers don’t bury dead cows It seems to affect where and what wolves eat!

 

Michigan has held one wolf hunt. That was in 2013, when 22 wolves were killed in the Upper Peninsula.

The next year, a federal judge put wolves back on the endangered species list.

Since then, lawmakers from Michigan, as well as Minnesota and Wisconsin, have tried to tack on riders to various bills in Congress that would “de-list” the wolves. These moves are backed by farmers who say wolves are preying on their livestock.

But now, a new study indicates those farmers may be contributing to that predation problem. How? By not burying their dead cows.

Tyler Petroelje led the study and joined Stateside today. He’s from the west side of Michigan and is a doctoral candidate in wildlife biology at Mississippi State University.

Listen to the full interview above, or read highlights below.

On the 1982 Bodies of Dead Animals Act

“In Michigan, it is illegal to have an open pit carcass dump. The carcasses have to be buried underground and if it’s near any wellhead, there’s specific regulations for the lining that has to be within those areas. But one of the problems is that a lot of these livestock owners and operators either don’t know about this or it’s just a generational [thing] where they’re continually using these carcass dumps over and over again.”

On how piles of cow carcasses impact the wolves

“Wolves in areas with cattle carcasses in these livestock carcass dumps tend to reduce their range size as compared to wolves feeding on mostly natural forage.

“…when you have this readily available livestock carcass dump, it’s a much easier prey source and it brings wolves to these areas and they’re spending more time around there. And we see that almost a quarter of their diet was being made up from these livestock carcass dumps when they’re available.”

Do carcass dumps lead to the complaint farmers have – that wolves are preying on livestock?

“This is an issue that we have to look more closely into, because in some areas, such as Oregon, they have recently found that when they remove these livestock carcass dumps, they were able to decrease wolf depredation [attacks] in that area.

“Now, in our study area, we did not actually have any livestock depredation that occurred by our collared wolves while they were feeding on these livestock carcass dumps.

“So this is an important issue we need to take a little bit closer look at. When these carcass dumps are available, are wolves happy with that and then they don’t depredate on the livestock? But if these carcass dumps are depleted, and they’re used to feeding on cattle, does that cause more human-wildlife conflict?

“And that’s an important issue, so we have to realize that if we have these food resources out on the landscape, they can modify wolf behavior, so they’re going to start coming in closer to human establishments and they’re going to start potentially causing human-wildlife conflict.”

According to the DNR, wolf attacks on livestock are down this year. Farmers reported only six attacks on livestock and two on dogs in 2017. That’s compared to 26 total attacks last year and the all-time high, 49 attacks in 2010.

Click here to see a map of wolves’ home ranges in areas with carcass dumps as compared to areas without. Map courtesy of Tyler Petroelje.

Source: When farmers don’t bury dead cows, it affects where and what wolves eat | Michigan Radio http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/carcassdump-713×750-1.png #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves

Counting wolves in the Upper Michigan Peninsula  

protect michigan wolves, protect the wolves

Breaking NEWS from Michigan DNR’s Kevin Swanson says Deer Population is way up. 😉

“We have a lot more deer on the landscape now,” says Swanson.

Wildlife specialists will soon be in the woods in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, tracking wolves.

The Department of Natural Resources last conducted a wolf census in 2016, when it estimated more than 600 wolves prowled in the U.P.

The DNR’s Kevin Swanson says they don’t know what to expect. But he says conditions may be right for an increase in the wolf population.

“We have a lot more deer on the landscape now,” says Swanson.

But Swanson says there are other factors, like canine distemper, that could negatively affect the wolf population.

“It seems our coyote numbers are down significantly in the Upper Peninsula over the last couple years.” says Swanson.

The official estimate of Michigan’s wolf population is not due until sometime in the spring.

Source: Counting wolves in the Upper Peninsula | Michigan Radio http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/OR7-1-2.jpg #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves

Governments in CO/UT/NM/AZ Deliberately Derailed Mexican Wolf Recovery, Documents Reveal (Investigative Report) 

Our Attorneys are waiting for Us to Raise Funds to get them in Court for Phoenix the Mexican Gray Female that USFWS should have relocated to a breeding program instead of Killing. Especially after the News led people to believe The Tribe requested it, when in fact we found out that they did not!

 

(EnviroNews Colorado) — After decades of deliberation the final revision of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan (the Plan) was released at the end of November, but former USFWS officials tell EnviroNews it strays far from scientists’ minimum recommendations for recovery of the gray wolf subspecies.

Meanwhile, a series of documents reveal lawmakers and agencies in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona — the four states central to recovery efforts — have been deliberately hamstringing wolf revival efforts for years.

David Parsons, former Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator for the USFWS from 1990 to 1999, told EnviroNews Colorado that instead of working to expand and stabilize wolf populations, the agency watered down the Plan and “essentially turned its mission over to the states” of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona — states that have repeatedly opposed many aspects of wolf recovery.

The Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), a.k.a. “el lobo,” was hunted to near-extinction during the late 1800’s and 1900’s. In 1976, it gained protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and by 1982 the USFWS launched the original Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan to keep the keystone predator from being wiped off the face of the earth.

The agency’s captive breeding program released three lineages of Mexican wolves into the wild in the U.S. starting in 1998, with Mexico releasing wolves in 2011. Today, 113 of these creatures inhabit central and southern Arizona and New Mexico while 31 wolves live in the northern Sierra Madre Occidental of Chihuahua and Sonora in Mexico.

Despite this modest rebound in numbers, poor genetic variability and limited high-quality habitat free from human encroachment means the future of the Mexican wolf remains bleak.

In 2014, Parsons joined a coalition of conservation groups in a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona against the USFWS for delaying completion of the Plan. In 2016, a court settlement required the agency to finish the plan by November 2017.

To achieve full recovery, the final Plan recommends the release of more captive-bred specimens in an effort to establish two “genetically diverse Mexican wolf populations distributed across ecologically and geographically diverse areas in the subspecies’ range in the United States and Mexico.” The estimated $178 million cost of recovery is to be borne by federal and state governments and NGOs.

The Plan’s ultimate goal is to increase Mexican wolf populations in the U.S. to 320 wolves and 200 in Mexico over the next 25 to 35 years, at which point the USFWS would remove the subspecies from the Endangered Species List.

In late 2011, the USFWS convened the Science and Planning Subgroup of the Recovery Team (the Subgroup) — staffed with independent scientists — which recommended a minimum of 750 wolves in the U.S. and 100 in Mexico, with three separate populations of 200 to 300 wolves, before delisting.

Parsons said that faced with these numbers, ranchers “just went ballistic.” Though stakeholders were sworn to secrecy, the Subgroup’s internal working draft was leaked and pro-ranching and hunting voices, including U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT), pushed back hard against the Plan.

“They just blew the thing up in the media,” said Parsons. “Fish and Wildlife Service, true to fashion reacted by just quitting — they canceled the next meeting of [the Subgroup]… and never held another one.”

In November 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southwest Region’s Biological Report for the Mexican Wolf determined that wolf numbers wouldn’t be based on science alone, but also what is “socially acceptable in light of the expected ongoing issues around livestock depredation and other forms of wolf-human conflict.”

“They essentially asked the states how many wolves they could tolerate,” Parsons said. “They called it a social tolerance limit based on their perception of social tolerance and not backed by any science whatsoever.”

Parsons also pointed out that, aside from the special interests associated with ranching and hunting, polls have shown the vast majority of the public in ArizonaNew MexicoUtah, and Colorado are in support of Mexican wolf reintroduction and recovery.

Another bone of contention within the Plan is the way it limits the Mexican wolf’s range to south of Interstate 40, which runs east to west across northern New Mexico and Arizona.

The Science and Planning Subgroup recommended including sections of eastern Arizona and New Mexico, the Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona and southern Utah, and the Southern Rockies area of northern New Mexico and southern Colorado as “three major core areas of suitable habitat… capable of supporting Mexican wolf populations of sufficient size to contribute to recovery.”

A 2015 study published in Biological Conservation concluded that “most of the [Mexican wolf’s] historic range in Mexico is currently unsuitable due to human activity” with a high probability of wolves in those regions being killed by people.

However, due to “geopolitical reasons,” the USFWS chose to leave out the Grand Canyon and Southern Rockies regions in the Plan, according to notes from an April 2016 Mexican Wolf Recovery Planning Workshop in Mexico City, Mexico.

Source: Governments in CO/UT/NM/AZ Deliberately Derailed Mexican Wolf Recovery, Documents Reveal (Investigative Report) – EnviroNews | The Environmental News Specialists http://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Mexican-wolf-Held-Captive-at-Minnesota-Zoo-for-Captive-Breeding-Photo-Wikimedia-Commons-1024×681.jpg #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves

Dr. Robert Wielgus Man of Integrity

Published on: Aug 31, 2016

After Listening to Dr. Rob Weilgus WSU Associate Professors videos, it is in fact our belief that he is a Man of Great Integrity. Please watch this video to completion and we will leave you to your own conclusions based on facts before us.

Protect The Wolves® in their phone conversation with Dr. Rob Weilgus, invited him to sit on our Board of Directors.

Dr. Rob Weilgus that invitation still stands!!

Dr. Wielgus is an associate professor and director of the Large Carnivore Conservation Lab at Washington State University in Pullman. His research has focused on the population, behavioral and habitat ecology of large carnivores, including cougars and wolves, and their prey. Dr. Wielgus’ current research is looking at livestock mortality rates in the wolf-occupied areas of Washington over a 15-year period, as well as the effects of non-lethal interventions on reducing wolf depredations and indirect effects on livestock in Washington. http://img.youtube.com/vi/ZfY4MoMCJcU/0.jpg #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #ProfanityPeakWolfPack #ProtectWolvesInWashington #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington