Man whose malamute was killed seeks legal fix

Help protect the wolves

Layne Spence still brings his two malamute dogs, Rex and Frank, to run along the Clark Fork River in Missoula, but he’s not ready to take them back into the woods.

“This is where I let them run around,” Spence said on a winter afternoon near the Higgins Avenue Bridge. “You can tell they need to run. But we were out on the Kim Williams Trail where they were doing some work, and when somebody used a nail gun, the dogs just freaked out.”

On Nov. 17, a hunter shot and killed Spence’s third malamute, Little Dave, on the road above Lee Creek Campground near Lolo Pass. Spence was cross-country skiing with Little Dave, Rex and Frank a few hundred yards from the road gate when he heard gunshots and saw the dog get hit. Spence said he screamed for the man to stop, but the shooting continued.

The hunter approached Spence and said he mistook Little Dave for a wolf. All three pet dogs were wearing lighted collars. The incident took place in the middle of Montana’s hunting season, but on a closed road popular for winter recreation.

Spence reported the incident to the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department, which determined it had no basis for further investigation. There is no state law making it a criminal act to accidentally kill someone’s domestic pet.

The sheriff’s office also sent details to the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the U.S. Forest Service. Both agencies found no legal basis to charge the hunter with a crime.

Several days after the incident became public, the hunter appeared at the sheriff’s department. After an interview, officials reconfirmed their previous position – no law was broken. They did not release the man’s identity or further details of the interview.

Still, Spence wants justice…… read the rest below

Layne Spence

Update 2013: Man whose malamute was killed seeks legal fix. https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/52894d58569d7.preview-100.jpg

Man whose malamute was killed seeks legal fix

Help protect the wolves

Layne Spence still brings his two malamute dogs, Rex and Frank, to run along the Clark Fork River in Missoula, but he’s not ready to take them back into the woods.

“This is where I let them run around,” Spence said on a winter afternoon near the Higgins Avenue Bridge. “You can tell they need to run. But we were out on the Kim Williams Trail where they were doing some work, and when somebody used a nail gun, the dogs just freaked out.”

On Nov. 17, a hunter shot and killed Spence’s third malamute, Little Dave, on the road above Lee Creek Campground near Lolo Pass. Spence was cross-country skiing with Little Dave, Rex and Frank a few hundred yards from the road gate when he heard gunshots and saw the dog get hit. Spence said he screamed for the man to stop, but the shooting continued.

The hunter approached Spence and said he mistook Little Dave for a wolf. All three pet dogs were wearing lighted collars. The incident took place in the middle of Montana’s hunting season, but on a closed road popular for winter recreation.

Spence reported the incident to the Missoula County Sheriff’s Department, which determined it had no basis for further investigation. There is no state law making it a criminal act to accidentally kill someone’s domestic pet.

The sheriff’s office also sent details to the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the U.S. Forest Service. Both agencies found no legal basis to charge the hunter with a crime.

Several days after the incident became public, the hunter appeared at the sheriff’s department. After an interview, officials reconfirmed their previous position – no law was broken. They did not release the man’s identity or further details of the interview.

Still, Spence wants justice…… read the rest below

Layne Spence

Update 2013: Man whose malamute was killed seeks legal fix. https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/52894d58569d7.preview-100.jpg

Wolves Prefer Salmon to Deer?

Wolves prefer Salmon

Wolves Prefer Salmon to Deer?

Anne Minard

for National Geographic News

September 3, 2008

Move over, grizzly bears. “Fishing wolves” in coastal British Columbia are also looking to snatch some salmon, and will eat the fish almost exclusively when they are available, new research reveals.

Biologists analyzed years of data from gray wolves’ feces to monitor what the animals were eating.

via Wolves Prefer Salmon to Deer?. https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/080903-wolves-salmon_170.jpg

Petition | Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property. | Change.org

Petitioning Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials

Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property.

Petition by

Wolves of the Rockies

via Petition | Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property. | Change.org.

Petition | Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property. | Change.org

Petitioning Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials

Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property.

Petition by

Wolves of the Rockies

via Petition | Montana State Lawmakers and Agency Officials : Enact laws that hold hunters accountable for reckless accidents that impact people, pets and property. | Change.org.

Wolves in the News | Timber Wolf Information Network

MI: Wolf hunt yields far short of harvest limit

JOHN PEPIN – Journal Staff Writer

MARQUETTE – Michigan’s first state-managed wolf hunt closed Tuesday, with hunters posting results falling far short of the harvest limit of 43 wolves.

The season opened Nov. 15. A total of 1,200 wolf hunting tags were sold at $100 each for state residents and $500 for non-residents. The hunting bag limit was one wolf per hunter for the season and no trapping was allowed.

As of midnight Tuesday, a total of 23 wolves had been killed from three Upper Peninsula wolf management zones. The hunt was designed to lessen wolf conflicts with animals and humans in three areas where non-lethal methods employed by the Michigan Departments of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to deter wolves had not been successful.

See the story below

Wolves in the News | Timber Wolf Information Network.

Wolves in the News | Timber Wolf Information Network

MI: Wolf hunt yields far short of harvest limit

JOHN PEPIN – Journal Staff Writer

MARQUETTE – Michigan’s first state-managed wolf hunt closed Tuesday, with hunters posting results falling far short of the harvest limit of 43 wolves.

The season opened Nov. 15. A total of 1,200 wolf hunting tags were sold at $100 each for state residents and $500 for non-residents. The hunting bag limit was one wolf per hunter for the season and no trapping was allowed.

As of midnight Tuesday, a total of 23 wolves had been killed from three Upper Peninsula wolf management zones. The hunt was designed to lessen wolf conflicts with animals and humans in three areas where non-lethal methods employed by the Michigan Departments of Natural Resources and Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to deter wolves had not been successful.

See the story below

Wolves in the News | Timber Wolf Information Network.

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

 

The Cherokee Nation became the 59th tribe to join the InterTribal Buffalo Council during a recent meeting in Las Vegas.

Joining the InterTribal Buffalo Council is the initial step in determining whether it is feasible for the tribe to acquire bison for tourism or commercial use.

“The Cherokee Nation’s acceptance into the InterTribal Buffalo Council is a very positive move in the bison acquisition process,” said Gunter Gulager, director of Cherokee Nation Natural Resources. “As a member of this council, the tribe will have access to the bison within our country’s national parks and be able to call upon experts to aid in the development of a business plan that best suits the tribe.”

The InterTribal Buffalo Council coordinates the transfer of surplus buffalo from national parks to tribal lands. It also provides training and technical assistance to its members. At least three other Oklahoma tribes are members, according to the InterTribal Buffalo Council website.

SEE MORE at the link below

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video).

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

 

The Cherokee Nation became the 59th tribe to join the InterTribal Buffalo Council during a recent meeting in Las Vegas.

Joining the InterTribal Buffalo Council is the initial step in determining whether it is feasible for the tribe to acquire bison for tourism or commercial use.

“The Cherokee Nation’s acceptance into the InterTribal Buffalo Council is a very positive move in the bison acquisition process,” said Gunter Gulager, director of Cherokee Nation Natural Resources. “As a member of this council, the tribe will have access to the bison within our country’s national parks and be able to call upon experts to aid in the development of a business plan that best suits the tribe.”

The InterTribal Buffalo Council coordinates the transfer of surplus buffalo from national parks to tribal lands. It also provides training and technical assistance to its members. At least three other Oklahoma tribes are members, according to the InterTribal Buffalo Council website.

SEE MORE at the link below

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video).

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video)

 

The Cherokee Nation became the 59th tribe to join the InterTribal Buffalo Council during a recent meeting in Las Vegas.

Joining the InterTribal Buffalo Council is the initial step in determining whether it is feasible for the tribe to acquire bison for tourism or commercial use.

“The Cherokee Nation’s acceptance into the InterTribal Buffalo Council is a very positive move in the bison acquisition process,” said Gunter Gulager, director of Cherokee Nation Natural Resources. “As a member of this council, the tribe will have access to the bison within our country’s national parks and be able to call upon experts to aid in the development of a business plan that best suits the tribe.”

The InterTribal Buffalo Council coordinates the transfer of surplus buffalo from national parks to tribal lands. It also provides training and technical assistance to its members. At least three other Oklahoma tribes are members, according to the InterTribal Buffalo Council website.

SEE MORE at the link below

White Wolf: Cherokee Nation Takes First Step to Acquire Bison (Video).