WDFW submits $26 million request for supplemental funds

Jay Inslee

Call Inslee  360-902-4111 and tell him to deny funds to WDFW and back up his words with action if he expects to get any Votes. and stop trying to ride on the backs of Wolves

Governor Inslee needs to start doing his Job if he wants to be re-elected and answer Us why he has refused to respond to Our Requests for a face to face meeting. Further he needs to back up his words that he does not agree with de-listing wolves with his own people. @Jayinslee begin by replacing Susewind and Martorello would be a great place to begin.

Jay, If you do not start backing up your article that you refuse to respond on the Public will see you for what you are a Political Vote Getting Liar trying to ride the backs of wolves.

https://www.governor.wa.gov › contact › contacting-governors-office

Contact. Online contact form; Write Governor Jay Inslee Office of the Governor PO Box 40002. Olympia, WA 98504-0002; Call 360-902-4111

Date
Contact

Public Affairs Contact: Carrie McCausland, 360-890-0996

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) on Thursday submitted a $26 million supplemental funding request to the Governor’s Office. It marks the first step in a process to gain support from the governor and Legislature for the funding to continue current services, address emerging issues, and deal with a backlog of legislated and unavoidable cost increases during the upcoming session.

“Our work provides tremendous value to the people in our state,” said WDFW Director Kelly Susewind. “The ongoing funds to create a fully healthy agency is critical to our residents’ quality of life, critical to our ability to conserve fish and wildlife, and critical to maintaining sustainable natural resource jobs across Washington.”

The bulk of the funding request, $12.5 million, would help the agency address an ongoing structural deficit driven by legislated and unavoidable cost increases, such as the rising costs of wages, centralized state services, and utility increases.

“I’m pleased that last year we presented to the Legislature the results of a performance audit that showed we are good stewards of our financial resources,” Susewind said.

To help manage that situation, the department has already made $2 million in cuts to services, and is seeking $6.7 million in ongoing funds to maintain other current services. Without this funding, by June 2020 the department will need to make:

  • Cuts to species and habitat conservation;
  • Cuts to fish and shellfish management and eight salmon and trout hatcheries;
  • Cuts to hunting opportunities;
  • Cuts to non-lethal methods of managing conflict between people and wildlife.
  • Cuts to shellfish inspections for the benefit of public safety;
  • Cuts in access to salmon and steelhead fishing on portions of the Columbia River and its tributaries;
  • Cuts to maintenance and forest health treatments across the million acres of public land managed by the department; and
  • Cuts to customer service.

These public services were also at risk in the last budget cycle, when state legislators provided enough one-time funding for the department to continue this work for another year.

The department is also requesting an additional $6.8 million in new, ongoing funds to address seven emerging needs:

Salmon monitoring throughout Puget Sound to provide for fishing and conservation;

  • Habitat recovery on more than 22,000 acres of public land burned by wildfires in 2019;
  • Help for property owners to provide fish protections, as recommended by the Governor’s Southern Resident Killer Whale Task Force;
  • Removal of sea lions preying on Columbia River salmon, as recommended by the Governor’s Southern Resident Killer Whale Task Force;
  • Columbia River fishery commitments;
  • Humpback whale protections; and
  • Continuation of a mobile app to help anglers comply with fishing rules.

“I recognize that this is a sizable request, especially in a supplemental session. We would rather not be in this position of requesting a substantial amount of money to sustain basic, core activities that we know provide such fundamental public value,” said Susewind. “We estimate that for every State General Fund tax dollar invested in WDFW, and leveraged with other fund sources, that fish and wildlife economic activities generate another $3.50 that goes back into the state coffers. We’re seeking adequate, ongoing funding to sustain that kind of return on investment into the future.”

The Fish and Wildlife Commission approved the department’s operating requests in August, plus a $22 million request in capital funding to reduce flooding risks and support hatchery work, including examining infrastructure needs to further increase salmon production for Southern Resident Killer Whales.

View more information on the department’s 2020 supplemental request online at: wdfw.wa.gov/2020supplemental.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities. Fishing, hunting, and wildlife-watching activities contribute over $4.5 billion each year in economic activity, and nearly $350 million per biennium directly to the State General Fund.

Source: WDFW submits $26 million request for supplemental funds, seeks ongoing funding to serve the public and conserve fish and wildlife | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/jayinslee-200×300.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews

WDFW Wag adds another Fear and Fairy Tale Spreader


WDFW Brings on another Fear and Fairy Tale Spreader 😉 Someone that will parrot exactly what WDFW Leaders want parroted

A well-known Spokane-area cross country coach is the newest member of a group tasked with guiding and directing wolf policy in Washington.

Bill Kemp hopes to represent “the small forest landowner” and the career teacher and coach worries that as Washington’s wolf population grows, people will be endangered.

“My kids grew up going out into woods,” he said. “But now with the advent of the wolf, I’m hesitant to let my grandkids go into the woods by themselves.”

Kemp is the newest member of the Wolf Advisory Group, an 18-person voluntary group tasked with representing the interests of environmentalists, hunters and livestock ranchers. There are four openings on the WAG.

Kemp coached cross country at Riverside in Chattaroy for three decades, for which he was inducted into Washington State Cross Country Coaches Association’s Hall of Fame in 2012. The Spokane native graduated from North Central in 1964.

Kemp started studying wildlife management at the University of Idaho, but “went a different direction with Vietnam.”

Since retiring from teaching and coaching, he said that interest in wildlife management has returned. As the owner of 300 acres of land in the Carpenter Ridge wolf pack range, he feels he’s well situated to represent the average citizen in the wolf debate.

Unlike many on the WAG, he doesn’t own livestock and he’s not a “member of any wolf society.”

“I can see all the different perspectives on the issue,” he said.

In particular, he said he has concerns about human safety. As a lifelong hunter, he said he’s seen more cougars in the past decade than ever before. He believes wolves will follow the same course.

Source: Retired Spokane-area coach, teacher joins wolf advisory group | The Spokesman-Review https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/SRX_KEMP.JPG_WmFViS1_t1200.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Confirmed wolf depredation and WDFW still doesnt mention Online Meetings

protect the wolves, washington state wolves, wag, wolf advisory group
We have our Eye on Donny Martorello!

Confirmed wolf depredation and WDFW still doesnt mention Online Meetings

Still no Mention of planned meetings that were scheduled that were changed to online, They have already held 1 meeting online this far
Publish date

On Sep. 11, a livestock producer reported an injured adult cow on private pasture to WDFW staff, who conducted an investigation on Sep. 12. The cow remained mobile after being injured, so the exact depredation location is unknown.

The investigation revealed multiple lacerations, puncture wounds, swelling, and hemorrhaging on the hindquarters extending into the groin and udder area. The cow was removed to the producer’s private ranch for treatment and healing, along with her calf so it would not be unaccompanied.

These injuries were indicative of wolf depredation. In addition, location data from the collared wolf in the Grouse Flats pack showed at least one member of the pack in the vicinity during the approximate time of the depredation. Based on the combination of tissue damage with associated hemorrhaging and wolf locations, WDFW staff classified this event as a confirmed wolf depredation.

The livestock producer who owns the affected livestock monitors the herd by range riding five to six days a week, maintains regular human presence in the area, uses Fox lights in their pastures, removes sick and injured livestock from the grazing area until they are healed, removes or secures livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and calves away from known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 lbs. before turnout.

The Grouse Flats pack has been involved in two depredations in the last 30 days and four in the last 10 months. WDFW includes a summary of all documented depredation activity within the past ten months in every monthly update.

On Sep. 9, WDFW notified the public about a livestock depredation involving the Grouse Flats pack which brought the total number of depredations by the pack to four in 10 months and two days. On Sep. 11, WDFW staff and Director Susewind discussed how best to address the situation and the Director decided lethal removal was not warranted at that time. WDFW staff and Director Susewind are now continuing to discuss how best to address this situation and mitigate further conflict.

Previous updates

2019 Grouse Flats pack updates

Source: Confirmed wolf depredation in Grouse Flats pack territory | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1.jpg #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #WolvesInTheNews

Younger Wolves Help Their Elders Grab a Bite to Eat 

Wolves work together in the wild to ensure the survival of the rest of their pack, and this includes their elders. Whenever one wolf finds food, it will investigate it for edibility before calling out to the pack with a loud howl.

Older wolves lack the brute force in their jaws necessary to tear open the rubbery flesh of certain types of food. In this video, we witness younger wolves picking up most of the slack to ensure that their grandparents can feast on some of the softer meat of a washed-up sea lion.

After the younger wolves have had their fair share and removed most of the rubbery skin from the deceased animal, the older wolf swoops in to enjoy some of the softer meat inside. With most of the hard work already done, the older wolf is able to sustain its appetite and live another day.

 

Source: Younger Wolves Help Their Elders Grab a Bite to Eat | Plants And Animals http://img.youtube.com/vi/Kw6oaTba4Ec/0.jpg #BanAnimalTrapping #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

WDFW Wolf post-recovery planning schedule

protect the wolvesStrange WDFW did not do a Press Release on the meeting Changes, appears they were trying to keep them silent. There was no mention in last weeks update that we saw either. These are underhanded methods to keep the majority of the Public away. Meeting Links are posted on Our Website 😉

Wolf post-recovery planning

Since 2008, Washington’s wolf population has grown by an average of 28 percent per year. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) documented a minimum of 126 individuals, 27 packs, and 15 successful breeding pairs during the last annual population survey, marking a population increase for the 10th consecutive year and the highest counts to date. Not only is Washington’s wolf population growing, but its distribution is also expanding westward in the state. In 2018, WDFW biologists confirmed the state’s first wolf pack west of the Cascade crest in the modern era. WDFW is confident that Washington’s wolf population is on a path leading to successful recovery.

Given the pace of wolf recovery, WDFW proposes to develop a post-recovery conservation and management plan for wolves to guide long-term wolf conservation and management under state authority once wolves are considered recovered in Washington and are no longer designated as state or federally endangered.

The development of this plan will be informed by public input. Information on how to provide input is at the link below. Three live, interactive webinars are also available. Each webinar is open to all, will include a presentation, opportunity to ask questions, and information on how to submit comments. Scheduled dates for each webinar are below. Click the link for each to participate.

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25, 12-1 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15 6:00-7:30 p.m.

 

Source: Wolf post-recovery planning | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Donny_Martorello-1-1-300×169-1-300×169.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Wyoming Wolf Trophy Zones slaughter 8 Possible Yellowstone Wolves

sacred resource protection zone, yellowstone wolves, protect the wolves

Will Yellowstone Wolves be available for your Grandchildren to view?

An estimated 528 wolves resided in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as of 2015. As of December 2018there were 80 wolves in 9 packs. A biological count (April 1, 2019) was 61 wolves in 8 packs.

With your help we can work towards insuring that they are!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today!

Before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

Everyday Possible Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes. Our Research is Precedent Setting 

  Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your Yellowstone wolves, grizzlies, wild horses.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in Blood thirsty states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with.

A total of it appears 8 possible park wolves have already been slaughtered in 2019 altogether 25 thus far in 2019 with 8 from the Trophy Zones  17 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State! Keep in mind that  these are just Wolves that have been reported killed! Does not take into account all that people chose not to report as they are required!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member with Just $1.00 per month so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 58,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold!

What will it take for the Government to Realize that Wyoming has once again proven they are incapable of managing The Public’s Federal Resources?

YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sept192019-300×214.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInYellowstone

Alexander: Loving Life, Hating Wolves

protect the wolves, sacred resource protection zoneWe do not agree in whole with this Oped do You? We do Agree that Man destroys everything he calls his own however. Hunting is a thing of the Past, it is no longer needed to survive in the Lower 48.  Email Jon and Let him know 😉 Jon Alexander is opinion editor at the Times-News. He can be reached.  jalexander@magicvalley.com.

 

There’s that moment before squeezing the trigger — excitement and a primal drive to finish the job. You’ve walked for miles, scouted for months and watched the breeze to assure you won’t be winded — all in the pursuit of this moment. You pull the trigger and the animal hops once as if stung by a hornet and topples head first.

I’ve always had a powerful emotional response to taking an animal’s life. The moments after sending a bullet plunging into the deer’s heart or lungs are some of the most confused feelings I’ve ever experienced. It’s always the same.Regret is invariably there to blunt the exhilaration of a successful hunt, especially as I walk up on the animal that, only minutes before, was a living being. It’s a deep-seated doubt of my actions, an emotion that seems to swell not in my mind, but in my stomach. I rationalize it away. The meat will save me a lot of cash in the months ahead. Deer aren’t penned or farmed. This herbivore lived its life and, as dictated by nature, is fair game to meat-eaters like me.

The emotional roller coaster is part of the hunt. It’s an awareness of one’s self and a keen connection to mankind’s half-a-million or so years as a full-on predator. I hunt for the connection to my genetic past. I hunt to force to the surface ancient instincts that are dulled by the modern world. I hunt to feel like a part of this inconsequential floating rock we call Earth.Maybe I’m again just rationalizing my taking of life when comparing to others. But, to me, there’s something different in the desire to kill wolves among many in Idaho. I kill with the knowledge that my single take won’t have a meaningful impact on the species’ overall population.

Regional extinction is the end game for those who slaughter wolves. They kill out of hatred. They kill out of a blood lust. With fewer and fewer children learning time-honored — and useful — outdoor skills, I can’t help but worry that the perception of blood-thirsty gunmen with a passion for eradication is working against the interests of outdoorsmen. Hate is the worst way to sell the sport.

NO Species modifies the planet as much as humanity. Even nature’s non-human engineer, the beaver, can’t hold a candle to how we alter ecosystems and consume resources. Man has a long history of eliminating anything that gets in the way of his pursuit of resources. Just ask our European cousin, the Neanderthal. Maybe Idaho’s wolf liquidation is just as human as my romantic notion of what I do when I take to rifle and round. But I don’t think so. I hunt out of respect. They hunt out of rage. It’s a small but important distinction that speaks to motive and manifests in the differing hunting cultures.

I pay for a sportsman’s license. I enjoy the wilderness more than any other place on the planet. It’s my church, in a way. But my fees are now subsidizing Idaho’s gently-named Wolf Control Board. Instead of reasonable, respectable management, I’m helping fund a massacre. And it turns my guts more than any instance when I pulled the trigger.

Jon Alexander is opinion editor at the Times-News. He can be reached at jalexander@magicvalley.com.

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/howler-750×500-3-750×500-750×500-300×200.png #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

For The Record Colorado Hunters Can’t blame this on Wolves

Trail use near Vail, Colorado, has more than doubled since 2009. It’s had a devastating impact on a herd of elk

Increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders, aren’t good for Elk populations. Imagine that, they cant blame Wolves for this one… ahhh damnnn and wait for it…. Ranchers Presence in your Public Lands has the same devastating effect on Your Ungulate Herds.

Biologists used to count over 1,000 head of elk from the air near Vail, Colorado. The majestic brown animals, a symbol of the American west, dotted hundreds of square miles of slopes and valleys.

But when researchers flew the same area in February for an annual elk count, they saw only 53.

“Very few elk, not even many tracks,” their notes read. “Lots of backcountry skiing tracks.”

The surprising culprit isn’t expanding fossil-fuel development, herd mismanagement by state agenciesor predators, wildlife managers say. It’s increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders. Researchers are now starting to understand why.

US national parks and wilderness areas have boomed in popularity in the last decade, with places like Yosemite national park hitting as many as 5 million visits a year. The influx is due to a mixture of visitation campaigns, particularly during traditional “off seasons”, and an explosion of social media exposure that has made hidden gems into national and even international viral sensations.

The impact on wildlife is only recently apparent, and the Vail elk herd may be one of the more egregious examples.

Outdoor recreation has long been popular in Colorado, but trail use near Vail has more than doubled since 2009. Some trails host as many as 170,000 people in a year.

Recreation continues nearly 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, said Bill Andree, who retired as Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Vail district wildlife manager in 2018. Night trail use in some areas has also gone up 30% in the past decade. People are traveling even deeper into woods and higher up peaks in part because of improved technology, and in part to escape crowds.

The elk in unit 45, as it’s called, live between 7,000 and 11,000 feet on the pine, spruce and aspen-covered hillsides and peaks of the Colorado Rockies, about 100 miles from Denver. Their numbers have been dropping precipitously since the early 2010s.

Pinterest
Elk stand in an open field in 2014 between the Eagle River and Interstate 70 just east of the town of Eagle, Colorado, near Vail, Colorado. Photograph: Richard Spitzer/The Guardian

Blaming hiking, biking and skiing is controversial in a state where outdoor recreation is expected to pump $62.5bn into the state’s economy in 2019, an 81% increase from 2014.

But for Bill Alldredge, a now-retired wildlife professor at Colorado State University, there is no other explanation. He started studying unit 45 in the 1980s in response to expanding ski resorts and trails systems.

To measure the impact on calves, he deliberately sent eight people hiking into calving areas until radio-collared elk showed signs of disturbance, such as standing up or walking away. The consequences were startling. About 30% of the elk calves died when their mothers were disturbed an average of seven times during calving. Models showed that if each cow elk was bothered 10 times during calving, all their calves would die.

When disturbances stopped, the number of calves bounced back.

Why, exactly, elk calves die after human activity as mellow as hiking is not entirely clear. Some likely perish because the mothers, startled by passing humans and their canine companions, run too far away for the calves to catch up, weakening the young and making them more susceptible to starvation or predation from lions or bears. Other times it may be that stress from passing recreationists results in the mother making less milk.

“If you’ve ever had a pregnant wife, and in the third trimester you chase her around the house in two feet of snow, you’ll get an idea of what she thinks about it,” Andree said.

The problems came to a head in 2017, when a group called the Vail Valley Mountain Trails Alliance proposed building a new trail through more of unit 45’s elk calving area.

Andree wrote a letter explaining the dire impact of constant recreation on elk. Even if certain trails were closed during calving season, he said, elk would still be disturbed because some people simply disregarded instructions for them to keep out.

“Generally when you ask people to stay out of the area no matter what the reason is, 80-90% obey you,” Andree said. “But if you get 10% who don’t obey you, you haven’t done any good.”

The recreation community acknowledges its impact on wildlife as well as other development, said Ernest Saeger, the executive director of the mountain trails alliance. Many people don’t understand the significance of the closures. Others, he acknowledged, just don’t care.

So the group formed a trail ambassador program to post more informative signs at closures and even place volunteers at trailheads to explain why trails are closed. The scheme reduced closure violations in 2018, according to Forest Service numbers.

If trail building and closure violations in critical habitat continue, Devin Duval, Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s district wildlife manager in the area, anticipates the worst.

“It will be a biological desert,” he said.

 

Source: Americans’ love of hiking has driven elk to the brink, scientists say | Environment | The Guardian https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/colvilleelkherd-1-300×225.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL

Wyoming Wolf Slaughter Trophy Zones slaughter 7 Possible Yellowstone Wolves in 2019

sacred resource protection zone, protect the wolves

Will Yellowstone Wolves be available for your Grandchildren to view?

With your help we can work towards insuring that they are!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today!

Before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

Everyday Possible Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes.

  Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your Yellowstone wolves, grizzlies, wild horses.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in Blood thirsty states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with.

A total of it appears 7 possible park wolves have already been slaughtered in 2019 altogether 24 thus far in 2019 with 7 from the Trophy Zones  17 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State! Keep in mind that  these are just Wolves that have been reported killed! Does not take into account all that people chose not to report as they are required!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member with Just $1.00 per month so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 58,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold!

What will it take for the Government to Realize that Wyoming has once again proven they are incapable of managing The Public’s Federal Resources?

YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sept152019-300×169.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Intelligent Ranchers Purchase Livestock and Cattle Insurance 

overgrazing, ban grazing allotments
This is what the Colville USFS is allowing to happen on your Childrens Resources better known as “Overgrazing”

Ranchers need to Purchase Livestock and Cattle Insurance just like any other business!

 

Owning an Excavation Company, We were never reimbursed from the Government for loss, it still amazes Us that Ranchers somehow think that the Government is responsible for theirs! Responsible Business Owners simply need to purchase Insurance.

Livestock and Farm Animal Insurance

From dairy cows to beef cattle, your livestock are important investments — which is why they need the right protection. Accidents, bad weather and crimes are unpredictable, but you can be prepared by having the right coverage in place. With American Family Insurance, we’ll help build you a policy that protects your livestock from the unexpected.

What Is Livestock and Cattle Insurance?

Livestock and cattle insurance is coverage that protects your animals from the unexpected. Whether on the farm, ranch or in transit, your animals are considered your personal property. And if something were to happen to them due to a covered loss, we’ll help cover the cost to remedy the issue.

Livestock Insurance Costs

We understand that no two farms run exactly the same way, that’s why, at American Family Insurance, our livestock policies are highly customizable. We’ll help you build a single, hardworking policy that protects your individual insurance needs.

Your policy will have limits on the amount we’ll cover for your animals. To select these limits, you’ll choose between two types of coverage:

Unscheduled (blanket) coverage: Blanket coverage is available and intended for insuring all farm personal property inventory under one total limit. An advantage of blanket coverage is our co-insurance terms. This means, that if the insured covers their farm personal property to the full value of all property, then there’s a built-in coverage cushion for when property values fluctuate or if the insured adds property which increases the actual blanket value.

Scheduled coverage: With schedule coverage, you can pick and choose the individual animals you would like to insure and assign a specific amount of insurance to each. This offers you customizable coverage based on your specific needs, usage and budget. And it gives you adequate limits for your higher valued animals.


What Kind of Animals Does Livestock Insurance Cover?

At American Family Insurance, your livestock insurance protects the following animals:

  • Cattle
  • Pigs
  • Sheep
  • Goats
  • Chickens
  • Horses
  • Bison
  • Buffalo
  • Llama
  • Alpaca
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Ostrich
  • Emu

Livestock and Cattle Insurance Coverage Options

When you have livestock insurance through American Family Insurance, your animals are covered for a variety of losses, including:

Accidents: Loading and unloading, electrocution, fire, smoke, explosions.

Natural disasters: Volcanic eruption and sinkholes. You also have the option to purchase earthquake coverage as additional coverage to keep your home and animals protected.

Weather events: Flooding, lightening, wind and hail.

Crimes and civil unrest: Theft and vandalism — take a look at our tips to help you prevent livestock theft.

Collision or other death while transporting.

Keep in mind that there may be a limit on the value of any one animal, although higher limits may be available.

You can add the animal perils endorsement to cover losses caused by:

  • Accidental shooting
  • Drowning
  • Attack by dogs or wild animals
  • Collapse of building

Remember that your livestock insurance doesn’t cover old age, disease or death by natural causes. If you’re interested in coverage for these types of losses, your agent can help you learn more about your options.


Livestock Liability Insurance

With your livestock and animal farm insurance, your animals are also provided coverage for liability. So if you’re found to be legally responsible for your animals causing bodily injury or property damage to other people or their property, you’ll have coverage under your policy.

To better protect your farm and acts of your animals, consider the farm and ranch umbrella liability coverage. An umbrella policy is an added layer of protection to better protect you financially in the event of an accident or lawsuit.

Request a Livestock Insurance Quote

Your livestock is essential to the success of your farm, so having the right protection for them is just as important as protecting everything else that helps your operation run smoothly. For confidence in your coverage, contact your American Family agent to make sure your needs are being met and all your questions are answered.

Looking for more ways to protect your farm? Take a look at our farm coverages to ensure you’re protecting what matters most.

Source: Livestock and Cattle Insurance | American Family Insurance https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cows5-300×225.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves