WDFWs Staci Lehman’s use of word Sacred is Racist in application!

protect the wolves, protect washington wolves

Staci Lehman, Wolves are NO LESS “SACRED” THAN OUR BROTHER GRIZZLY! I suggest that you stop using the word sacred it is not only condescending in the manner in which you used, and We consider your usage A Racist Discriminatory Abominable statement that disrespects Traditional Native American Views.

Staci, you are right up their with the Attorney Generals Office when they discriminated against Our Views.

Please join Our Movement to get precedent setting research into the courts while We still have wolves left.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is trying to kill one to two of the nine wolves in the Grouse Flats pack, in the southeast corner of the state.

That’s because the pack has killed two cattle in the past month and four cattle in the past 10 months.

The state Fish and Wildlife director authorized the lethal removal on Tuesday, and state agents headed out to look for the animals on Thursday. At least one of the wolves has a collar.

The pack spends some of its time in Oregon; when the wolves are there, Washington agents can’t kill them.

Staci Lehman, an agency spokesperson, said the ranchers in the area have taken steps to keep wolves away from their cattle. They’ve employed cowboys and fox lights to try to scare wolves, and they’ve removed sick and injured animals. But none of that worked, so now the agency is trying lethal removal.

“The point is to try to change the behavior of the other pack members,” Lehman said. “Sometimes, if you take out an alpha wolf, the others will change their behavior.”

It costs the state about $20,000 to kill one wolf.

It’s a technique the department uses to manage wolves in the eastern third of the state, where the animals are not listed as federally endangered.

Some wildlife advocates say the technique doesn’t work. But Lehman said it works in many cases—most recently when the agency killed one wolf in the Smackout Pack in northeast Washington in November 2018. The pack hasn’t killed any cattle since.

Lehman said the agency does not track how often killing one or two wolves works to keep a pack from killing cattle, and how often the agency has to go back and eliminate more members of the pack.

That said, Lehman added, the agency takes the decision to kill wolves very seriously.

“It’s never an easy decision to make a lethal removal,” she said. “People—they’re so divided on it. They’re like, ‘Why do we need them if they haven’t been here so long?’

And then others are like, ‘It’s sacred that we’re bringing them back!’”

To date, no lawsuits have been filed to stop the lethal removal of the Grouse Flats pack.

This summer, the department killed eight wolves from the Old Profanity Territory Pack in northeast Washington, four of them hours before a court order to protect them.

Since early August, the department has also had a lethal removal order for one to two members of the Togo Pack, in northeast Washington, but the agency has not killed any members of that pack.

Source: KUOW – Seeking: Wolves marked for death in Washington state https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-1.jpg #CutOffUSDAWildlifeServicesFunding #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInWashington

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks :: Governor’s Grizzly Bear Advisory Council to Convene in Helena

Councils & Committees News

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Contacts:
Marissa Perry, Communications Director, Governor’s Office, (406) 444-4514
Vivaca Crowser, Regional Information and Education Program Manager, FWP, (406) 542-5518
Dillon Tabish, Regional Information and Education Program Manager, FWP, (406) 751-4564

Newly formed citizen group meeting for the first time Oct. 3-4

Helena, MT — The Governor’s Grizzly Bear Advisory Council is convening for its first meeting next month in Helena.

The council will gather Oct. 3-4 at the Kleffner Ranch, 305 Montana Highway 518, in East Helena. The meeting is open to the public.

The inaugural meeting will cover the objectives and structure of the council and set the stage for the group’s work over the next year. The meeting will feature presentations on grizzly bear biology and ecology, management, and legal specifications, as well as facilitated discussions on key issues and challenges. There will be an open forum for public comment on both days.

Shawn Johnson and Heather Stokes from the University of Montana’s Center for Natural Resources & Environmental Policy program will facilitate the meetings. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks staff will assist throughout the council’s tenure with a technical support team.

In March, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock announced his intention to appoint a citizen advisory council to facilitate a statewide discussion on long-term grizzly bear management and conservation. Bullock solicited applications for council membership beginning in April, seeking individuals with a diversity of views and commitment to working together on the future of grizzly bears in Montana. More than 150 people from across the state applied. Bullock worked in consultation with FWP before making his final selections.

Bullock announced the appointment of 18 Montana citizens to the new council in July. Bullock appointed the council to reflect the diverse group of people who have a connection to grizzly bears, including those who live, work, and recreate in bear country. The council is intentionally representative of the different parts of the state where grizzlies are currently or may soon be found.

Over the next year, the advisory council’s work will center around broad objectives including:

  • Maintaining and enhancing human safety;
  • Ensuring a healthy and sustainable grizzly bear population;
  • Improving timely and effective response to conflicts involving grizzly bears;
  • Engaging all partners in grizzly-related outreach and conflict prevention; and
  • Improving intergovernmental, interagency, and tribal coordination.

For more information about the council, including an agenda for the upcoming meeting and a list of council members, visit http://fwp.mt.gov/fishAndWildlife/management/grizzlyBear/gbac.html.

Source: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks :: Governor’s Grizzly Bear Advisory Council to Convene in Helena https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/bear-cub-4-1-300×200.jpeg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheGrizzlies

Stay Tuned Seattletimes to Print Our Op-ed next Monday or Tuesday

Stay Tuned Seattletimes to Print Our Op-ed Monday Or Tuesday they claim. We were emailed this morning. With the new Lethal Removal Order being issued by WDFWs pandering Officials it is a perfect time to get some Focus on these Ranchers that are claiming that they are only a 4th or 5th Gen Rancher. Wake Up, Traditional First Nations have been here thousands of Years, not just a couple hundred.

We had to shorten it immensely for the Seattletimes, However Our Full Version will be available when we post the op-ed they put out for Us. https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Announcement: Protect The Wolves Pack is 1 Step Closer

protect the wolves

Announcement: Protect The Wolves Pack is now Official and almost registered as Our 501c4. The IRS made us apply the old fashion way for our EIN which took 8 weeks to get approved.

We are nothing more than the Voice for those that do not have one that uses tools that not all Large NGOs have available. Yet for some reason they still refuse to respond to any Invitations to be able to take Advantage of those tools.

  https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/PTWPcover-300×114.jpg

Wyoming Trophy Hunters slaughter 10 Possible Yellowstone Wolves

sacred resource protection zone, protect the wolves, yellowstone wolves

Join Us as One Voice and Take Back the Power that You as the public hold! 

Will Yellowstone Wolves be available for your Grandchildren to view?

Everyday Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes. Our Research is Precedent Setting and with your help will begin to make a needed difference not just for wolves, but grizzlies, bison that migrate out of the park.

An estimated 528 wolves had resided in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as of 2015.

As of December 2018there were 80 wolves in 9 packs.

A biological count (April 1, 2019) was 61 wolves in 8 packs.

Wolves need your help Today and we can work towards insuring that they are!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today!

Before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. pitch in just $1.00 per month to begin getting our precedent setting research into the courts. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

Everyday Possible Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes. Our Research is Precedent Setting 

  Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your Yellowstone wolves, grizzlies, wild horses.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in Blood thirsty states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with.

A total of it appears 10 possible park wolves have already been slaughtered in 2019 altogether 27 thus far in 2019 with 10 from the Trophy Zones  17 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State! Keep in mind that  these are just Wolves that have been reported killed! Does not take into account all that people chose not to report as they are required!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member with Just $1.00 per month so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 58,000 plus followers.

What will it take for the Government to Realize that Wyoming has once again proven they are incapable of managing The Public’s Federal Resources?

YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sept272019-300×195.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInYellowstone

WDFW Director authorizes lethal action in Grouse Flats wolf pack 

WDFW Director authorizes lethal action in Grouse Flats wolf pack

WDFW hasnt learned from their past mistakes yet that killing wolves explodes into countless depredations. They only do it to pacify Ranchers. It is past time to call for Susewind and Martorellos Jobs. It is time for Jay Inslee to Back up his words!
Publish date

WDFW Director Kelly Susewind today (Sep. 24, 2019) authorized the incremental removal of wolves from the Grouse Flats pack in response to repeated depredations of cattle on grazing lands in southeast Washington.

The Grouse Flats pack has been involved in two depredations in the last 30 days and four in the last 10 months. WDFW includes a summary of all documented depredation activity within the past 10 months in every monthly update.

Proactive nonlethal deterrents (described below) used by livestock producers in the area have not influenced pack behavior to reduce the potential for continued depredations on livestock. Director Susewind’s decision is consistent with the guidance of the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and the provisions of the Department’s wolf-livestock interaction protocol.

WDFW’s approach to incremental lethal removal consists of a period of active lethal removal operations followed by an evaluation period to determine if those actions changed the pack’s behavior.

The goal of lethal removal, as described in the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan, is to manage wolf-livestock conflicts to minimize livestock losses without undermining the recovery of a sustainable wolf population. The purpose of the lethal action (and nonlethal tools) in the Grouse Flats pack is to influence or change pack behavior to reduce the potential for continued depredations on livestock while continuing to promote wolf recovery.

Consistent with the guidance of the plan and protocol, the rationale for authorizing lethal removal of Grouse Flats wolves is as follows:

  1. WDFW has documented ongoing depredation on livestock by the pack since Aug. 23, 2018 (seven total, four within the last 10 months and two in the last 30 days). The depredations were shared with the public in a timely manner, as described in the protocol.
  2. At least two proactive deterrence measures and responsive deterrence measures (if applicable) were implemented and did not meet the goal of influencing/changing pack behavior. During the 2019 grazing season, the following nonlethal deterrents were implemented:
  • Prior to the grazing season, Producer 1, who experienced a depredation on WDFW’s 4-O Ranch Wildlife Area, had the following nonlethal, proactive deterrence measures in place: monitoring the herd by range riding at least every other day per the grazing lease with WDFW, maintaining regular human presence in the area, removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area, removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and avoiding known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 pounds before turnout. Following the depredation, the producer hired two additional range riders and increased the frequency of range riding and human presence on the allotment. The producer also installed Fox lights and moved the cattle to a smaller fenced pasture where they could be monitored more effectively. The producer removed the cattle from the grazing allotment to pastures out of state on Aug. 10 when the lease expired.
  • Prior to the grazing season, Producer 2, who grazes on private pastures, had the following nonlethal, proactive deterrence measures in place: monitoring the herd by range riding multiple times weekly, maintaining regular human presence in the area, removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area, removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and avoiding known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 pounds before turnout. After the depredation occurred, the producer increased the frequency of range riding and human presence on the private pasture.
  • Prior to the grazing season, Producer 3, who grazes on private pastures, had the following nonlethal, proactive deterrence measures in place: monitoring the herd by range riding multiple times weekly, maintaining regular human presence in the area, deploying Fox lights, removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area, removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and calving away from known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 pounds before turnout. After the first depredation in the Grouse Flats territory occurred on the 4-O Ranch Wildlife Area, the producer hired additional range riders and increased range riding frequency to five days a week along with daily human presence. The producer also worked with WDFW to increase the number of Fox lights on the private pastures and installed trail cameras to monitor wolf activity in the area.
  • Prior to the grazing season, Producer 4, who grazes on a WDFW allotment and private pastures, had the following nonlethal, proactive deterrence measures in place: monitoring the herd by range riding at least every other day per the grazing lease with WDFW, maintaining regular human presence in the area, using Fox lights in their pastures, removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area, removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and calving away from known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 pounds before turnout. After the first depredation in the Grouse Flats territory occurred on the 4-O Ranch Wildlife Area, the producer increased range riding frequency to five to six days a week, worked with WDFW to increase the number of Fox lights on the private pastures, and installed trail cameras to monitor wolf activity in the area.
  1. The department documented these deterrents in the agency’s “wolf-livestock mitigation measures” checklist, with date entries for deterrent tools and coordination with the producer and range rider.
  2. WDFW expects depredations to continue based on the history of this pack. The most recent depredation by the Grouse Flats pack is the second event in 30 days and forth event in 10 months. This series of repeated depredations shows a pattern in pack behavior as defined in the wolf-livestock interaction protocol. WDFW staff believe depredations are likely to continue even with nonlethal tools being utilized.
  3. The lethal removal of wolves in the Grouse Flats pack is not expected to harm the wolf population’s ability to reach the statewide recovery objective.

    The Department’s wolf plan modeled lethal removal to help inform decision makers during this stage of recovery. The analysis in the plan included wolf survival estimates from northwest Montana, which incorporated a 28% mortality rate. Agency lethal control was factored into that 28% mortality estimate. To err on the side of caution (i.e., when in doubt, assume greater impact to wolf population so the true impact is not underestimated), the scenarios modeled in the wolf plan and published by Maletzke et al. (2015) included an even higher level of lethal removal (i.e., removing 30% of population every four years in addition to baseline 28% mortality rate). Based on that modeling analysis, as well as an analysis of higher levels of potential mortality on the actual population level of wolves in the eastern recovery zone and statewide, we do not expect the lethal removal levels considered in 2019 to jeopardize wolf recovery in the eastern recovery zone or statewide.

    In addition, wolf populations in northwest Montana and central Idaho experienced an annual mortality rate of 19-28% and still reached recovery goals in those states. When a similar mortality rate is projected to Washington’s current minimum count of 126 wolves, total mortality would be 24-35 wolves per year.

The department is providing one business day (eight court hours) advance public notice before initiating lethal removal activity. WDFW will use humane lethal removal methods consistent with state and federal laws. The objective is to use the best methods available while considering human safety, humaneness to wolves, swift completion of the removal, weather, efficacy, and cost.

WDFW will keep the public informed about this activity through weekly updates. The next update will be provided on Oct. 1.

Previous updates

2019 Grouse Flats pack updates

July 12
July 25
Sep. 9
Sep. 20

WDFW will provide a final report on this and any other lethal removal operations during 2019 in the Washington Gray Wolf Conservation and Management 2019 Annual Report, which will be published during spring 2020.

A summary of all documented depredation activity within the past 10 months is included in every monthly wolf update.

 

Packs
Grouse Flats

Source: WDFW Director authorizes lethal action in Grouse Flats wolf pack | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/howler-750×500-3-750×500-750×500-300×200-300×200-1.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Wyoming says National Park wolf poacher can continue doing business as an outfitter

protect the wolves, sacred resource protection zone

Wyoming clearly doesn’t care about upholding the law when they allow a guide that gets paid to know what hes doing get away with killing Our Sacred Brother inside a National Park. Just 1 more reason that Our National Park Wildlife are in dire need of our proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”.

In a troubling lapse of moral accountability, a Wyoming state board will allow a man who killed a female wolf in the Grand Teton National Park and then dragged her body out of the park in violation of federal law to continue operating as a professional outfitter and hunting guide in the state.

In August, the Wyoming Board of Outfitters and Professional Guides decided to grant Brian Taylor, a self-avowed “wolf hater”, with a conditional one-year license, and denied a complaint the Humane Society of the United States filed in May asking that the board withdraw Taylor’s license for his crime of wolf poaching, which occurred in December 2018.

Earlier this year, Taylor, who also sits on the board of a local non-profit, the Wyoming Outfitters and Guides Association, was found guilty in federal court on the charge of poaching. Yet, despite the severity of his crime, the federal court gave him a mild rebuke: a $5,000 fine and suspension of his wolf-hunting privileges for a year. And the board itself subsequently denied our complaint and only reprimanded the convicted poacher, giving him a conditional permit to operate for the next year.

There’s something wrong when a crime that so clearly violates a foundational federal wildlife law is so lightly punished. The penalties imposed fell far short of those outlined under the Lacey Act, which prohibits the discharge of a weapon and killing of wildlife in a national park, along with the transportation of the animal’s body outside a national park. Under the Lacey Act, a single violation is punishable by a maximum fine of $10,000 and up to one-year imprisonment.

The HSUS’s own investigations and review of documents the Jackson Hole News & Guideobtained via a Freedom of Information Act request revealed that Taylor did not just violate federal wildlife law while on National Park Service lands, he also violated state law and regulations governing the conduct of professional outfitters.

Taylor, as a professional outfitter, had a duty to know the laws concerning wildlife hunting in the state, and Wyoming’s failure to vigorously prosecute him sets a dangerous precedent. That he can continue doing business as usual is unthinkable to most Americans. A poacher who breaks the law and deprives other Wyoming residents of the pleasure of seeing a protected animal in a national park should receive a punishment commensurate with his misconduct. We will continue to press for greater accountability in this case. For the sake of its wildlife, and as matter of moral and legal principle, Wyoming needs to reconsider its decision.

Source: A Humane World https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/GrizzlyandWolf-750×432-750×432-1-300×173-1-300×173.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInWashington #WolvesInYellowstone

WDFW submits $26 million request for supplemental funds

Jay Inslee

Call Inslee  360-902-4111 and tell him to deny funds to WDFW and back up his words with action if he expects to get any Votes. and stop trying to ride on the backs of Wolves

Governor Inslee needs to start doing his Job if he wants to be re-elected and answer Us why he has refused to respond to Our Requests for a face to face meeting. Further he needs to back up his words that he does not agree with de-listing wolves with his own people. @Jayinslee begin by replacing Susewind and Martorello would be a great place to begin.

Jay, If you do not start backing up your article that you refuse to respond on the Public will see you for what you are a Political Vote Getting Liar trying to ride the backs of wolves.

https://www.governor.wa.gov › contact › contacting-governors-office

Contact. Online contact form; Write Governor Jay Inslee Office of the Governor PO Box 40002. Olympia, WA 98504-0002; Call 360-902-4111

Date
Contact

Public Affairs Contact: Carrie McCausland, 360-890-0996

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) on Thursday submitted a $26 million supplemental funding request to the Governor’s Office. It marks the first step in a process to gain support from the governor and Legislature for the funding to continue current services, address emerging issues, and deal with a backlog of legislated and unavoidable cost increases during the upcoming session.

“Our work provides tremendous value to the people in our state,” said WDFW Director Kelly Susewind. “The ongoing funds to create a fully healthy agency is critical to our residents’ quality of life, critical to our ability to conserve fish and wildlife, and critical to maintaining sustainable natural resource jobs across Washington.”

The bulk of the funding request, $12.5 million, would help the agency address an ongoing structural deficit driven by legislated and unavoidable cost increases, such as the rising costs of wages, centralized state services, and utility increases.

“I’m pleased that last year we presented to the Legislature the results of a performance audit that showed we are good stewards of our financial resources,” Susewind said.

To help manage that situation, the department has already made $2 million in cuts to services, and is seeking $6.7 million in ongoing funds to maintain other current services. Without this funding, by June 2020 the department will need to make:

  • Cuts to species and habitat conservation;
  • Cuts to fish and shellfish management and eight salmon and trout hatcheries;
  • Cuts to hunting opportunities;
  • Cuts to non-lethal methods of managing conflict between people and wildlife.
  • Cuts to shellfish inspections for the benefit of public safety;
  • Cuts in access to salmon and steelhead fishing on portions of the Columbia River and its tributaries;
  • Cuts to maintenance and forest health treatments across the million acres of public land managed by the department; and
  • Cuts to customer service.

These public services were also at risk in the last budget cycle, when state legislators provided enough one-time funding for the department to continue this work for another year.

The department is also requesting an additional $6.8 million in new, ongoing funds to address seven emerging needs:

Salmon monitoring throughout Puget Sound to provide for fishing and conservation;

  • Habitat recovery on more than 22,000 acres of public land burned by wildfires in 2019;
  • Help for property owners to provide fish protections, as recommended by the Governor’s Southern Resident Killer Whale Task Force;
  • Removal of sea lions preying on Columbia River salmon, as recommended by the Governor’s Southern Resident Killer Whale Task Force;
  • Columbia River fishery commitments;
  • Humpback whale protections; and
  • Continuation of a mobile app to help anglers comply with fishing rules.

“I recognize that this is a sizable request, especially in a supplemental session. We would rather not be in this position of requesting a substantial amount of money to sustain basic, core activities that we know provide such fundamental public value,” said Susewind. “We estimate that for every State General Fund tax dollar invested in WDFW, and leveraged with other fund sources, that fish and wildlife economic activities generate another $3.50 that goes back into the state coffers. We’re seeking adequate, ongoing funding to sustain that kind of return on investment into the future.”

The Fish and Wildlife Commission approved the department’s operating requests in August, plus a $22 million request in capital funding to reduce flooding risks and support hatchery work, including examining infrastructure needs to further increase salmon production for Southern Resident Killer Whales.

View more information on the department’s 2020 supplemental request online at: wdfw.wa.gov/2020supplemental.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities. Fishing, hunting, and wildlife-watching activities contribute over $4.5 billion each year in economic activity, and nearly $350 million per biennium directly to the State General Fund.

Source: WDFW submits $26 million request for supplemental funds, seeks ongoing funding to serve the public and conserve fish and wildlife | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/jayinslee-200×300.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInTheNews

WDFW Wag adds another Fear and Fairy Tale Spreader


WDFW Brings on another Fear and Fairy Tale Spreader 😉 Someone that will parrot exactly what WDFW Leaders want parroted

A well-known Spokane-area cross country coach is the newest member of a group tasked with guiding and directing wolf policy in Washington.

Bill Kemp hopes to represent “the small forest landowner” and the career teacher and coach worries that as Washington’s wolf population grows, people will be endangered.

“My kids grew up going out into woods,” he said. “But now with the advent of the wolf, I’m hesitant to let my grandkids go into the woods by themselves.”

Kemp is the newest member of the Wolf Advisory Group, an 18-person voluntary group tasked with representing the interests of environmentalists, hunters and livestock ranchers. There are four openings on the WAG.

Kemp coached cross country at Riverside in Chattaroy for three decades, for which he was inducted into Washington State Cross Country Coaches Association’s Hall of Fame in 2012. The Spokane native graduated from North Central in 1964.

Kemp started studying wildlife management at the University of Idaho, but “went a different direction with Vietnam.”

Since retiring from teaching and coaching, he said that interest in wildlife management has returned. As the owner of 300 acres of land in the Carpenter Ridge wolf pack range, he feels he’s well situated to represent the average citizen in the wolf debate.

Unlike many on the WAG, he doesn’t own livestock and he’s not a “member of any wolf society.”

“I can see all the different perspectives on the issue,” he said.

In particular, he said he has concerns about human safety. As a lifelong hunter, he said he’s seen more cougars in the past decade than ever before. He believes wolves will follow the same course.

Source: Retired Spokane-area coach, teacher joins wolf advisory group | The Spokesman-Review https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/SRX_KEMP.JPG_WmFViS1_t1200.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Confirmed wolf depredation and WDFW still doesnt mention Online Meetings

protect the wolves, washington state wolves, wag, wolf advisory group
We have our Eye on Donny Martorello!

Confirmed wolf depredation and WDFW still doesnt mention Online Meetings

Still no Mention of planned meetings that were scheduled that were changed to online, They have already held 1 meeting online this far
Publish date

On Sep. 11, a livestock producer reported an injured adult cow on private pasture to WDFW staff, who conducted an investigation on Sep. 12. The cow remained mobile after being injured, so the exact depredation location is unknown.

The investigation revealed multiple lacerations, puncture wounds, swelling, and hemorrhaging on the hindquarters extending into the groin and udder area. The cow was removed to the producer’s private ranch for treatment and healing, along with her calf so it would not be unaccompanied.

These injuries were indicative of wolf depredation. In addition, location data from the collared wolf in the Grouse Flats pack showed at least one member of the pack in the vicinity during the approximate time of the depredation. Based on the combination of tissue damage with associated hemorrhaging and wolf locations, WDFW staff classified this event as a confirmed wolf depredation.

The livestock producer who owns the affected livestock monitors the herd by range riding five to six days a week, maintains regular human presence in the area, uses Fox lights in their pastures, removes sick and injured livestock from the grazing area until they are healed, removes or secures livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd, and calves away from known wolf high activity areas. Calves are typically at least 200 lbs. before turnout.

The Grouse Flats pack has been involved in two depredations in the last 30 days and four in the last 10 months. WDFW includes a summary of all documented depredation activity within the past ten months in every monthly update.

On Sep. 9, WDFW notified the public about a livestock depredation involving the Grouse Flats pack which brought the total number of depredations by the pack to four in 10 months and two days. On Sep. 11, WDFW staff and Director Susewind discussed how best to address the situation and the Director decided lethal removal was not warranted at that time. WDFW staff and Director Susewind are now continuing to discuss how best to address this situation and mitigate further conflict.

Previous updates

2019 Grouse Flats pack updates

Source: Confirmed wolf depredation in Grouse Flats pack territory | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/denaliwolfeye-2-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-300×200-2-300×200-1-300×200-2-300×200-2-300×200-1.jpg #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #WolvesInTheNews