Anatomy of a wolf count

Wolf Count

GILA NATIONAL FOREST — It took only a millisecond after wildlife officials opened the door of his crate for M1296, a male Mexican gray wolf, to dart out onto a smooth sheet of sun-crusted snow.

He started at a sprint but after 30 yards or so, 1296 slowed down to a walk and began weaving and stumbling, looking perplexed. It was as if he had just landed on another planet.

A few minutes later, though, the handsome, tan and cinnamon-colored wolf found his bearings and was off, loping through the ponderosa pines of New Mexico’s Gila National Forest.

The behavior of 1296 wasn’t surprising to federal biologists watching him. It had been quite the day for the nearly 4-year-old canid.

Just a few hours before, the Mexican gray wolf had been spotted by federal wildlife officials scouting the forest in a helicopter. After a 16-minute pursuit, 1296 was darted, anesthetized and scooped up to be checked, measured and collared as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s annual count of the endangered species.

It’s a labor-intensive, multi-step process that the federal wildlife agency, along with tribal and state partners, conducts every year to monitor the progress of the wolves’ recovery in the Southwest.

Nearly completely exterminated by humans in the early and mid-1900s, the Mexican gray wolf population was down to seven wolves from three lineages by the 1970s. Since then, the number of wolves that roam through about 7,000 square miles near the New Mexico-Arizona border has grown to at least 110, according to last year’s count. The results of this count, which runs through Feb. 3 will give the most up-to-date status of the population.

In addition to counting the wolves, the interagency field team also temporarily captures a certain number of the wolves to examine them, give them vaccines, draw blood, measure their bodies and fit them with tracking collars. Doing so provides scientists and wildlife managers important information about where the wolves are roaming, which informs their decisions on areas for future reintroductions. The information also alerts scientists to signs of inbreeding in the wolf population and helps them monitor predation of large game and livestock.

Anatomy of a wolf count

About 20 people from local, state, federal and tribal agencies are helping out on the Mexican gray wolf counts this year. The team is stationed in a cluster of trailers just outside the small town of Alpine in the White Mountains. The counts always happen in the winter because that is when the population is most stable — young wolves have dispersed from their home packs to find a mate and biologists can better determine how many pups born in the spring have survived their first year, said Jeff Humphrey, spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Snow also slows the animals down when they are being tracked by helicopter and the white ground cover makes them easier to spot.

Each day, the interagency field team focuses on counting a few packs, or extended family groups, and prioritizes certain wolves for capture. In the case of 1296, biologists wanted to fit him with a GPS collar, instead of one that uses radio waves, said Sherry Barrett, Mexican wolf recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

A helicopter and a spotting plane tag team the count and capture effort. Once they spot the wolves, the helicopter flies just above the treetops as a designated biologist, hooked into a body harness, leans out of the open doorway to dart the wolf. It took two eight-minute pursuits with a five-minute rest in between before Ole Alcumbrac, project veterinarian, was able to nab 1296.

After the anesthesia from the dart kicked in, the wolf was muzzled, his front and back legs tied and then he was loaded into Alcumbrac’s arms to be flown back to the team’s Alpine base.

Inside the trailer, where a conference table doubled as the examination surface, the 74-pound wolf was laid down while biologists crowded around. They administered vaccines, took the animal’s temperature and pulse, drew blood and measured its paws, body and teeth.

While the veterinarians and biologists worked, Julia Smith, a biologist with the Arizona Game and Fish Department, tracked down 1296’s history. In 2013 when he was a year old, the wolf was trapped by a hunter in New Mexico. When U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials arrived, he looked terrible, with broken teeth and abrasions, Smith said. She doubted he would survive. But he did and has been roaming across western New Mexico ever since. His first mate died in 2014, but he found another lady friend just this year. Biologists hope they’ll mate this spring.

After about 40 minutes, the processing was done and the still groggy wolf was carefully loaded into a crate for the journey back home.

The long drive out to 1296’s territory wound through ponderosa pines and meadows dotted with scrubby brush. Cows grazing along the route were a reminder of the fragile balance between the wolves’ recovery and livestock grazing.

The wolf was released in an opening of scrubby grass and knee-high shrubs close to where he was found hours before. As the canid trotted off into the trees, biologists had a good feeling he wouldn’t be alone for long — as the truck carrying 1296 neared the point of release, another wolf was seen running through the trees. More than likely, it was his mate, anxiously awaiting her partner’s return, Barrett said.

Source: Anatomy of a wolf count https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/wolfcount.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL #WolvesInArizona #WolvesInColorado #WolvesInNewMexico

Elected Officials allowed to muzzle Dr Robert Wielguses Research

Profanity peak pack, protect the wolves,
Profanity Peak mother no longer with us.

It is a sad day when Elected Officials are allowed to meddle with Science. Especially considering that they have no concerns of the Laws that appear to have been broken by doing so. Further Inslee sat in His Governors office and allowed it to happen after what must be millions of requests to step in and stop this pandering to Ranchers by WDFW.

It is past time to hold Washingtons Elected Officials accountable for their blatant actions as well as inaction’s, then claiming that they do not want Wolves delisted from the Endangered Species List. Jay Inslee should be ashamed of himself for allowing not only Our Reported Discrimination by Washington States Attorney General against our Organization in addition to allowing the conflict of interest participate in his States Wolf Advisory Group better known as “WAG”.

The lengths that Politicians will stoop to to try to gain votes is saddening. Inslee claims he doesnt think that wolves should be delisted out of 1 side of his mouth yet nothing to speak out for the Special Interest influence against Washingtons Wolves comes out the other side.

Inslee then appoints a Cattle Rancher to WDFWs Board of Commisioners. That in itself speaks Volumes on Inslees true position! We already have one alleged felon in the whitehouse we certainly do not need another that uses Your children’s resources to garner Votes when he does absolutely ZERO to protect them.

The Conservation Groups that helped push through Dashiells Emailed Lethal Action policy desires into Policy should also be ashamed of themselves. They have no business being involved in the protection of Your Children’s Resources. Guess what, according to Erik Molvars article they are now

Other conservation groups initially chose to collaborate on allowing wolf killings in response to livestock losses, citing social tolerance, but even the collaborators are now backing away from the state wolf plan and its failure to require nonlethal methods, and some are now openly critical. They lost their opportunity by allowing it to come to pass in the way they did. Had they spoke out against it the entire time, perhaps they could have saved some face. Our Opinion remains they Sold Out Your Children’s Resources and until they admit their error they are in denial.

Below are Excerpts taken from an Article written by Erik Molvar, Director of Western Watersheds Project.

The latest example in a long and painful litany of ranchers’ abuse comes courtesy of Len McIrvin and his Diamond M Ranch in Washington. McIrvin’s complaints about livestock losses have spurred multiple kill orders against wolves by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This latest wolf war initiated by the livestock industry began with the snuffing of the entire Profanity Pack after the Diamond M Ranch released its livestock in 2016 on national forest lands in close proximity to a known wolf den.

Dr. Rob Weilgus of Washington State University exposed this rancher-caused conflict, and subsequently released research demonstrating that the killing of wolves had no effect on future livestock losses. The livestock industry struck back against the science through Rep. Joel Kretz, their ally in the state legislature, who engineered a deal to shut down funding for Dr. Weilgus’ wolf research. Legislators further threatened the university with the withdrawal of millions of dollars in funding for a medical school to muzzle Dr. Weilgus.

The killing of the Profanity Pack was followed by kill orders for the Sherman Pack, the Smackout and Togo Packs, and later kill orders against the wolves who came in to fill the vacant territory on Profanity Peak, a pack now called the Old Profanity Territory (OPT) Pack. All through these killings, the “social tolerance” for wolves among locals has not increased one iota; if anything, McIrvin’s calls for more wolf killings have become more strident and frequent over time, and the controversial wolf killings continue.

While McIrvin and his Diamond M have been implicated in the majority of wolf kills in central Washington, but no other ranchers in Washington seems to be having major problems.

The conflict-to-killing outcome is exactly what the Washington state wolf plan envisions. From the outset, some wildlife advocates opposed killing wolves, listed as an ‘endangered species’ in Washington under state law, and refused to endorse the state wolf plan. Other conservationists initially chose to collaborate on allowing wolf killingsin response to livestock losses, citing social tolerance, but even the collaborators are now backing away from the state wolf plan and its failure to require nonlethal methods, and some are now openly critical. The kill orders have become a nationwide scandal and an embarrassment to Governor Jay Inslee and WFDW Director Kelly Susewind, whose competence and environmental ethics have been called into question.

Source: Social tolerance for wolves (and ranchers) | The Wildlife News https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/blackwolfpack-750×514-1-750×514-750×514-1.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #ProfanityPeakWolfPack #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInWashington

conservation – test post

protect the wolves, protect red wolves

Test Post Conservation

con·ser·va·tion
/ˌkänsərˈvāSH(ə)n/
Learn to pronounce
noun
  1. 1.
    prevention of wasteful use of a resource.
    “the government must take action to promote energy conservation”
    • preservation, protection, or restoration of the natural environment and of wildlife.
      “nature conservation”
      synonyms: preservationprotection, safeguarding, safe keeping, keeping, guarding, saving, looking after;

      carechargecustodyguardianshiphusbandrysupervision;
      upkeep, keeping up, keeping going, keeping alive, maintenancerepairrestoration;
      ecologyenvironmentalism
      “the conservation of tropical forests”

 

Source: conservation – Google Search https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/redwolffamily.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves

Jay Inslee appoints Douglas County Cattle Rancher to WDFW Commissioners

Jay Inslee

For Jay Inslee not to think that Wolves  shouldn’t be delisted, his actions speak Volumes by appointing a Rancher to WDFW Commissioners Board. How is it that People have brainwashed themselves into thinking that hunting animals is conservation? Below is the meaning of the term “Conservation” non of which include hunting 😉

Inslees pandering to Ranchers is no excuse for his claiming he doesn’t want wolves removed from the ESL.

Jay Inslee has already proven that he doesn’t mind discrimination, nor does he seem to care about wildlife as he claims looking at his latest appointment.

con·ser·va·tion
/ˌkänsərˈvāSH(ə)n/
Learn to pronounce
noun
  1. 1.
    prevention of wasteful use of a resource.
    “the government must take action to promote energy conservation”
    • preservation, protection, or restoration of the natural environment and of wildlife.
      “nature conservation”
      synonyms: preservationprotection, safeguarding, safe keeping, keeping, guarding, saving, looking after;

      carechargecustodyguardianshiphusbandrysupervision;
      upkeep, keeping up, keeping going, keeping alive, maintenancerepairrestoration;
      ecologyenvironmentalism
      “the conservation of tropical forests”

Governor Jay Inslee appointed a Douglas County resident to the State’s Fish and Wildlife Commission. Molly Linville is a cattle rancher out of Douglas County, a member of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association, and grew up hunting and fishing in Washington. For four years, Linville has been active on the Fish & Wildlife Wolf Advisory Group. Linville is also a former wildlife biologist with experience working on federally threatened and endangered wildlife species issues. She graduated from the University of Montana with a bachelor’s degree in wildlife biology. Inslee also appointed James Anderson, a sportsman from Pierce County. Outgoing commission member, Jay Holzmiller, of Asotin County, has served since 2013.

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is comprised of nine citizen members and advises the State Department of Fish and Wildlife.

 

Source: Douglas County Cattle Rancher Appointed – KOZI https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/jayinslee.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInWashington

Wyomings Cheney Accuses Tribes of “Destroying our Western Way of Life” Over Sacred Grizzly Protections SERIOUSLY?

Protect The Wolves, sacred resource protection zone. protect the grizzlies

Cheney is way out of line on this ridiculous statement.  Tribes destroyed the Western way of life? SERIOUSLY? What exactly did Liz Cheney learn in school? Did she forget that Tribes were here long before her ancestors were… evidently Cheney refuses to acknowledge the horrific acts of her Ancestors, the lying, cheating, stealing, raping and killing portions. Narrow minds like Cheney have no business holding office because they somehow seem to forget they represent the Public of the US.

RIVERTON, Wyo. — On a momentous day for Tribal Nations, Congresswoman Liz Cheney (R-WY), the House Republican Conference Chairwoman, stated that the successful litigation by tribes and environmentalists to return the grizzly bear in Greater Yellowstone to the Endangered Species Act (ESA) “was not based on science or facts” but motivated by plaintiffs “intent on destroying our Western way of life.”

One of the largest tribal-plaintiff alliances in recent memory prevailed in the landmark case, Crow Tribe et al v. Zinke last September, when US District Judge Dana Christensen ruled in favor of the tribes and environmental groups after finding that the Trump Administration’s US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) had failed to abide by the ESA and exceeded its authority in attempting to remove federal protections from the grizzly. Tuesday, USFWS officially returned federal protections to the grizzly.

Removing protections from the bear, revered as sacred to a multitude of tribes, would have left the grizzly vulnerable to high-dollar trophy hunts and lifted leasing restrictions on some 34,375 square miles. Extractive industry, livestock and logging interests are among those desirous of capitalizing on the area, a region comprised of tribal treaty, reserved rights and ceded lands.

“IF THIS WASN’T LIZ CHENEY AND THE ERA OF THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION, YOU MIGHT BE RENDERED SPEECHLESS BY THE INSENSITIVITY AND MENDACITY OF THE STATEMENT,” SAID TOM RODGERS, A SENIOR ADVISER TO THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN TRIBAL LEADERS COUNCIL (RMTLC), WHO TESTIFIED AT MAY’S CONGRESSIONAL HEARING ON THE TRIBAL HERITAGE AND GRIZZLY BEAR PROTECTION ACT. HR 2532, INTRODUCED BY HOUSE NATURAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN RAUL GRIJALVA, WAS INSPIRED BY THE GRIZZLY TREATY SIGNED BY OVER 200 TRIBAL NATIONS.

“So, in striving to protect our culture, our religious and spiritual freedoms, our sovereignty and our treaty rights – all of which are encapsulated in the grizzly issue – we are ‘destroying’ Cheney’s idea of the ‘Western way of life’?” questioned Rodgers. “I would remind the Congresswoman that at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition an estimated 100,000 grizzly bears roamed from the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast. That was all Indian Country. Now there are fewer than 2,000 grizzly bears and our people live in Third World conditions on meager reservations in the poorest counties in the US. Does she really want to talk about ‘destroying’ a ‘way of life’?” asked Rodgers.

“Unfortunately, it comes as no surprise that recent attempts by the Administration to remove protections for the grizzly, as well as blatant disregard for proper Tribal consultation, warrant our attention,” commented Congressman Joe Neguse (D-CO), who chaired the hearing on HR 2532. Rodgers’ written response to a question by Rep. Neguse traces contemporary wildlife management practices employed by the USFWS and the states back to the Doctrine of Discovery. The account, which has been widely praised by organizations including Sierra Club and Earth Justice, is posted in the Congressional Record (https://docs.house.gov/meetings/II/II13/20190515/109483/HHRG-116-II13-20190515-QFR003.pdf).

“That response is vital for our people. I urge everybody to read it. We must be aware of where, why and how the status-quo came to be and understand that these actions consistently undermine tribal sovereignty and disenfranchise our people,” said Lynnette Grey Bull, Senior Vice President of Global Indigenous Council, who also testified at the hearing.

Grey Bull resides on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, among Cheney’s constituents. Both the Northern Arapaho Tribe and Eastern Shoshone Tribe passed official resolutions and issued numerous communications opposing the delisting and trophy hunting of the grizzly bear. The Northern Arapaho Business Council was compelled to issue a “Cease and Desist” letter to the Department of Interior “regarding consistent misrepresentations of the Northern Arapaho Tribe’s position on grizzly delisting.”

Cheney contends that, “the ruling that forced today’s action was both needless and harmful to the ecosystem, which is why I introduced legislation earlier this year to reinstate the original, science-based decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to delist the grizzly and prevent future court action on the delisting, returning management of the grizzly back to the state where it belongs.”

Tribal Nations, including the Oglala Sioux Tribe which petitioned for a Congressional inquiry into the influence of multi-national fossil-fuel corporations on FWS’s grizzly delisting decision, previously exposed the role of extractive industry in the process. USFWS engaged multinational oil and gas services group, Amec Foster Wheeler, for the peer review of its grizzly delisting rule that tribes and environmental groups deconstructed in court. Amec Foster Wheeler appointed Halliburton executive Jonathan Lewis as CEO in the same timeframe as USFWS contracted the company.

“That puts ‘harmful to the ecosystem’ into its true context,” responded Rodgers. “The Cheney family’s connections to Halliburton hardly needs elaborating upon,” added Chief Stan Grier, President of the Blackfoot Confederacy Chiefs. Grier and Blackfeet Chairman, Tim Davis, are at the forefront of the effort to stop the grizzly being delisted and trophy hunted in the Glacier National Park region, the heartland of Blackfoot Confederacy territory.

Cheney’s attempt to legislatively “prevent future court action on the delisting” was previously challenged by a coalition of tribes in testimony to the US Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.

Any attempt . . . to legislatively nullify the Court’s ruling in Crow Tribe et al v. Zinke– to once again strip ESA protections from the grizzly bear – will, in addition to defying the Court, suborn the federal-Indian trust responsibility.  Given that the Constitution states, ‘all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land,’ the rights of Indian tribes cannot be treated as ‘temporary and precarious,’ as would be the case if Crow Tribe et al v. Zinke was legislatively subverted,” submitted the RMTLC, the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association and the Blackfoot Confederacy.

“There’s more chance of her father receiving the Nobel Peace Prize than her Grizzly Bear State Management Act reaching the House floor,” said Rodgers of Cheney’s bill.

 

 

Source: Rep. Cheney Accuses Tribes of “Destroying our Western Way of Life” Over Sacred Grizzly Protections — Native News Online https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Rep-Cheney-600×338-1.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves