Younger Wolves Help Their Elders Grab a Bite to Eat 

Wolves work together in the wild to ensure the survival of the rest of their pack, and this includes their elders. Whenever one wolf finds food, it will investigate it for edibility before calling out to the pack with a loud howl.

Older wolves lack the brute force in their jaws necessary to tear open the rubbery flesh of certain types of food. In this video, we witness younger wolves picking up most of the slack to ensure that their grandparents can feast on some of the softer meat of a washed-up sea lion.

After the younger wolves have had their fair share and removed most of the rubbery skin from the deceased animal, the older wolf swoops in to enjoy some of the softer meat inside. With most of the hard work already done, the older wolf is able to sustain its appetite and live another day.

 

Source: Younger Wolves Help Their Elders Grab a Bite to Eat | Plants And Animals http://img.youtube.com/vi/Kw6oaTba4Ec/0.jpg #BanAnimalTrapping #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

WDFW Wolf post-recovery planning schedule

protect the wolvesStrange WDFW did not do a Press Release on the meeting Changes, appears they were trying to keep them silent. There was no mention in last weeks update that we saw either. These are underhanded methods to keep the majority of the Public away. Meeting Links are posted on Our Website 😉

Wolf post-recovery planning

Since 2008, Washington’s wolf population has grown by an average of 28 percent per year. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) documented a minimum of 126 individuals, 27 packs, and 15 successful breeding pairs during the last annual population survey, marking a population increase for the 10th consecutive year and the highest counts to date. Not only is Washington’s wolf population growing, but its distribution is also expanding westward in the state. In 2018, WDFW biologists confirmed the state’s first wolf pack west of the Cascade crest in the modern era. WDFW is confident that Washington’s wolf population is on a path leading to successful recovery.

Given the pace of wolf recovery, WDFW proposes to develop a post-recovery conservation and management plan for wolves to guide long-term wolf conservation and management under state authority once wolves are considered recovered in Washington and are no longer designated as state or federally endangered.

The development of this plan will be informed by public input. Information on how to provide input is at the link below. Three live, interactive webinars are also available. Each webinar is open to all, will include a presentation, opportunity to ask questions, and information on how to submit comments. Scheduled dates for each webinar are below. Click the link for each to participate.

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25, 12-1 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 15 6:00-7:30 p.m.

 

Source: Wolf post-recovery planning | Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Donny_Martorello-1-1-300×169-1-300×169.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInWashington

Wyoming Wolf Trophy Zones slaughter 8 Possible Yellowstone Wolves

sacred resource protection zone, yellowstone wolves, protect the wolves

Will Yellowstone Wolves be available for your Grandchildren to view?

An estimated 528 wolves resided in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as of 2015. As of December 2018there were 80 wolves in 9 packs. A biological count (April 1, 2019) was 61 wolves in 8 packs.

With your help we can work towards insuring that they are!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today!

Before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

Everyday Possible Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes. Our Research is Precedent Setting 

  Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your Yellowstone wolves, grizzlies, wild horses.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in Blood thirsty states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with.

A total of it appears 8 possible park wolves have already been slaughtered in 2019 altogether 25 thus far in 2019 with 8 from the Trophy Zones  17 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State! Keep in mind that  these are just Wolves that have been reported killed! Does not take into account all that people chose not to report as they are required!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member with Just $1.00 per month so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 58,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold!

What will it take for the Government to Realize that Wyoming has once again proven they are incapable of managing The Public’s Federal Resources?

YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sept192019-300×214.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews #WolvesInYellowstone

Alexander: Loving Life, Hating Wolves

protect the wolves, sacred resource protection zoneWe do not agree in whole with this Oped do You? We do Agree that Man destroys everything he calls his own however. Hunting is a thing of the Past, it is no longer needed to survive in the Lower 48.  Email Jon and Let him know 😉 Jon Alexander is opinion editor at the Times-News. He can be reached.  jalexander@magicvalley.com.

 

There’s that moment before squeezing the trigger — excitement and a primal drive to finish the job. You’ve walked for miles, scouted for months and watched the breeze to assure you won’t be winded — all in the pursuit of this moment. You pull the trigger and the animal hops once as if stung by a hornet and topples head first.

I’ve always had a powerful emotional response to taking an animal’s life. The moments after sending a bullet plunging into the deer’s heart or lungs are some of the most confused feelings I’ve ever experienced. It’s always the same.Regret is invariably there to blunt the exhilaration of a successful hunt, especially as I walk up on the animal that, only minutes before, was a living being. It’s a deep-seated doubt of my actions, an emotion that seems to swell not in my mind, but in my stomach. I rationalize it away. The meat will save me a lot of cash in the months ahead. Deer aren’t penned or farmed. This herbivore lived its life and, as dictated by nature, is fair game to meat-eaters like me.

The emotional roller coaster is part of the hunt. It’s an awareness of one’s self and a keen connection to mankind’s half-a-million or so years as a full-on predator. I hunt for the connection to my genetic past. I hunt to force to the surface ancient instincts that are dulled by the modern world. I hunt to feel like a part of this inconsequential floating rock we call Earth.Maybe I’m again just rationalizing my taking of life when comparing to others. But, to me, there’s something different in the desire to kill wolves among many in Idaho. I kill with the knowledge that my single take won’t have a meaningful impact on the species’ overall population.

Regional extinction is the end game for those who slaughter wolves. They kill out of hatred. They kill out of a blood lust. With fewer and fewer children learning time-honored — and useful — outdoor skills, I can’t help but worry that the perception of blood-thirsty gunmen with a passion for eradication is working against the interests of outdoorsmen. Hate is the worst way to sell the sport.

NO Species modifies the planet as much as humanity. Even nature’s non-human engineer, the beaver, can’t hold a candle to how we alter ecosystems and consume resources. Man has a long history of eliminating anything that gets in the way of his pursuit of resources. Just ask our European cousin, the Neanderthal. Maybe Idaho’s wolf liquidation is just as human as my romantic notion of what I do when I take to rifle and round. But I don’t think so. I hunt out of respect. They hunt out of rage. It’s a small but important distinction that speaks to motive and manifests in the differing hunting cultures.

I pay for a sportsman’s license. I enjoy the wilderness more than any other place on the planet. It’s my church, in a way. But my fees are now subsidizing Idaho’s gently-named Wolf Control Board. Instead of reasonable, respectable management, I’m helping fund a massacre. And it turns my guts more than any instance when I pulled the trigger.

Jon Alexander is opinion editor at the Times-News. He can be reached at jalexander@magicvalley.com.

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/howler-750×500-3-750×500-750×500-300×200.png #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInTheNews

For The Record Colorado Hunters Can’t blame this on Wolves

Trail use near Vail, Colorado, has more than doubled since 2009. It’s had a devastating impact on a herd of elk

Increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders, aren’t good for Elk populations. Imagine that, they cant blame Wolves for this one… ahhh damnnn and wait for it…. Ranchers Presence in your Public Lands has the same devastating effect on Your Ungulate Herds.

Biologists used to count over 1,000 head of elk from the air near Vail, Colorado. The majestic brown animals, a symbol of the American west, dotted hundreds of square miles of slopes and valleys.

But when researchers flew the same area in February for an annual elk count, they saw only 53.

“Very few elk, not even many tracks,” their notes read. “Lots of backcountry skiing tracks.”

The surprising culprit isn’t expanding fossil-fuel development, herd mismanagement by state agenciesor predators, wildlife managers say. It’s increasing numbers of outdoor recreationists – everything from hikers, mountain bikers and backcountry skiers to Jeep, all-terrain vehicle and motorcycle riders. Researchers are now starting to understand why.

US national parks and wilderness areas have boomed in popularity in the last decade, with places like Yosemite national park hitting as many as 5 million visits a year. The influx is due to a mixture of visitation campaigns, particularly during traditional “off seasons”, and an explosion of social media exposure that has made hidden gems into national and even international viral sensations.

The impact on wildlife is only recently apparent, and the Vail elk herd may be one of the more egregious examples.

Outdoor recreation has long been popular in Colorado, but trail use near Vail has more than doubled since 2009. Some trails host as many as 170,000 people in a year.

Recreation continues nearly 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, said Bill Andree, who retired as Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Vail district wildlife manager in 2018. Night trail use in some areas has also gone up 30% in the past decade. People are traveling even deeper into woods and higher up peaks in part because of improved technology, and in part to escape crowds.

The elk in unit 45, as it’s called, live between 7,000 and 11,000 feet on the pine, spruce and aspen-covered hillsides and peaks of the Colorado Rockies, about 100 miles from Denver. Their numbers have been dropping precipitously since the early 2010s.

Pinterest
Elk stand in an open field in 2014 between the Eagle River and Interstate 70 just east of the town of Eagle, Colorado, near Vail, Colorado. Photograph: Richard Spitzer/The Guardian

Blaming hiking, biking and skiing is controversial in a state where outdoor recreation is expected to pump $62.5bn into the state’s economy in 2019, an 81% increase from 2014.

But for Bill Alldredge, a now-retired wildlife professor at Colorado State University, there is no other explanation. He started studying unit 45 in the 1980s in response to expanding ski resorts and trails systems.

To measure the impact on calves, he deliberately sent eight people hiking into calving areas until radio-collared elk showed signs of disturbance, such as standing up or walking away. The consequences were startling. About 30% of the elk calves died when their mothers were disturbed an average of seven times during calving. Models showed that if each cow elk was bothered 10 times during calving, all their calves would die.

When disturbances stopped, the number of calves bounced back.

Why, exactly, elk calves die after human activity as mellow as hiking is not entirely clear. Some likely perish because the mothers, startled by passing humans and their canine companions, run too far away for the calves to catch up, weakening the young and making them more susceptible to starvation or predation from lions or bears. Other times it may be that stress from passing recreationists results in the mother making less milk.

“If you’ve ever had a pregnant wife, and in the third trimester you chase her around the house in two feet of snow, you’ll get an idea of what she thinks about it,” Andree said.

The problems came to a head in 2017, when a group called the Vail Valley Mountain Trails Alliance proposed building a new trail through more of unit 45’s elk calving area.

Andree wrote a letter explaining the dire impact of constant recreation on elk. Even if certain trails were closed during calving season, he said, elk would still be disturbed because some people simply disregarded instructions for them to keep out.

“Generally when you ask people to stay out of the area no matter what the reason is, 80-90% obey you,” Andree said. “But if you get 10% who don’t obey you, you haven’t done any good.”

The recreation community acknowledges its impact on wildlife as well as other development, said Ernest Saeger, the executive director of the mountain trails alliance. Many people don’t understand the significance of the closures. Others, he acknowledged, just don’t care.

So the group formed a trail ambassador program to post more informative signs at closures and even place volunteers at trailheads to explain why trails are closed. The scheme reduced closure violations in 2018, according to Forest Service numbers.

If trail building and closure violations in critical habitat continue, Devin Duval, Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s district wildlife manager in the area, anticipates the worst.

“It will be a biological desert,” he said.

 

Source: Americans’ love of hiking has driven elk to the brink, scientists say | Environment | The Guardian https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/colvilleelkherd-1-300×225.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #RestoreWolvesToESL

Wyoming Wolf Slaughter Trophy Zones slaughter 7 Possible Yellowstone Wolves in 2019

sacred resource protection zone, protect the wolves

Will Yellowstone Wolves be available for your Grandchildren to view?

With your help we can work towards insuring that they are!

Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today!

Before they wipe out the rest of Your wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

Everyday Possible Yellowstone Wolves are being needlessly slaughtered in Wyoming, and need our Proposed “Sacred Resource Protection Zone”, along with proposed regulation changes.

  Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of Your Yellowstone wolves, grizzlies, wild horses.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a “Sacred Resource Protection Zone” Surrounding National Parks in Blood thirsty states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana to begin with.

A total of it appears 7 possible park wolves have already been slaughtered in 2019 altogether 24 thus far in 2019 with 7 from the Trophy Zones  17 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State! Keep in mind that  these are just Wolves that have been reported killed! Does not take into account all that people chose not to report as they are required!!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member with Just $1.00 per month so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 58,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold!

What will it take for the Government to Realize that Wyoming has once again proven they are incapable of managing The Public’s Federal Resources?

YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sept152019-300×169.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #WolvesInYellowstone

Intelligent Ranchers Purchase Livestock and Cattle Insurance 

overgrazing, ban grazing allotments
This is what the Colville USFS is allowing to happen on your Childrens Resources better known as “Overgrazing”

Ranchers need to Purchase Livestock and Cattle Insurance just like any other business!

 

Owning an Excavation Company, We were never reimbursed from the Government for loss, it still amazes Us that Ranchers somehow think that the Government is responsible for theirs! Responsible Business Owners simply need to purchase Insurance.

Livestock and Farm Animal Insurance

From dairy cows to beef cattle, your livestock are important investments — which is why they need the right protection. Accidents, bad weather and crimes are unpredictable, but you can be prepared by having the right coverage in place. With American Family Insurance, we’ll help build you a policy that protects your livestock from the unexpected.

What Is Livestock and Cattle Insurance?

Livestock and cattle insurance is coverage that protects your animals from the unexpected. Whether on the farm, ranch or in transit, your animals are considered your personal property. And if something were to happen to them due to a covered loss, we’ll help cover the cost to remedy the issue.

Livestock Insurance Costs

We understand that no two farms run exactly the same way, that’s why, at American Family Insurance, our livestock policies are highly customizable. We’ll help you build a single, hardworking policy that protects your individual insurance needs.

Your policy will have limits on the amount we’ll cover for your animals. To select these limits, you’ll choose between two types of coverage:

Unscheduled (blanket) coverage: Blanket coverage is available and intended for insuring all farm personal property inventory under one total limit. An advantage of blanket coverage is our co-insurance terms. This means, that if the insured covers their farm personal property to the full value of all property, then there’s a built-in coverage cushion for when property values fluctuate or if the insured adds property which increases the actual blanket value.

Scheduled coverage: With schedule coverage, you can pick and choose the individual animals you would like to insure and assign a specific amount of insurance to each. This offers you customizable coverage based on your specific needs, usage and budget. And it gives you adequate limits for your higher valued animals.


What Kind of Animals Does Livestock Insurance Cover?

At American Family Insurance, your livestock insurance protects the following animals:

  • Cattle
  • Pigs
  • Sheep
  • Goats
  • Chickens
  • Horses
  • Bison
  • Buffalo
  • Llama
  • Alpaca
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Ostrich
  • Emu

Livestock and Cattle Insurance Coverage Options

When you have livestock insurance through American Family Insurance, your animals are covered for a variety of losses, including:

Accidents: Loading and unloading, electrocution, fire, smoke, explosions.

Natural disasters: Volcanic eruption and sinkholes. You also have the option to purchase earthquake coverage as additional coverage to keep your home and animals protected.

Weather events: Flooding, lightening, wind and hail.

Crimes and civil unrest: Theft and vandalism — take a look at our tips to help you prevent livestock theft.

Collision or other death while transporting.

Keep in mind that there may be a limit on the value of any one animal, although higher limits may be available.

You can add the animal perils endorsement to cover losses caused by:

  • Accidental shooting
  • Drowning
  • Attack by dogs or wild animals
  • Collapse of building

Remember that your livestock insurance doesn’t cover old age, disease or death by natural causes. If you’re interested in coverage for these types of losses, your agent can help you learn more about your options.


Livestock Liability Insurance

With your livestock and animal farm insurance, your animals are also provided coverage for liability. So if you’re found to be legally responsible for your animals causing bodily injury or property damage to other people or their property, you’ll have coverage under your policy.

To better protect your farm and acts of your animals, consider the farm and ranch umbrella liability coverage. An umbrella policy is an added layer of protection to better protect you financially in the event of an accident or lawsuit.

Request a Livestock Insurance Quote

Your livestock is essential to the success of your farm, so having the right protection for them is just as important as protecting everything else that helps your operation run smoothly. For confidence in your coverage, contact your American Family agent to make sure your needs are being met and all your questions are answered.

Looking for more ways to protect your farm? Take a look at our farm coverages to ensure you’re protecting what matters most.

Source: Livestock and Cattle Insurance | American Family Insurance https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cows5-300×225.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #GrayWolves #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves

They will have loyalties to the rancher,” Said Cattle Producers President Scott Nielsen

Colville Grazing Allotment DamageLoyalty to Ranchers isnt what is Needed!!

It is Loyalty to Our Childrens Resources that is, which is mandated upon WDFW.

Well to begin with this isnt the first time! Secondly, How long will Jay Inslee, Washington State’s Governor allow this Special Interest Rancher back patting to continue? They have Ignored Our Request to Join their Range Rider Program for years.

 

From Source: For the first time, a cattlemen’s group will receive state money to help ranchers avoid conflicts with wolves in four northeast Washington counties.

With the $144,908 grant, announced Wednesday, the Cattle Producers of Washington will put people in the field to work with ranchers in Ferry, Okanogan, Pend Oreille and Stevens counties.

“They will have loyalties to the rancher,” Cattle Producers President Scott Nielsen said. “We want them to have credibility with the ranchers, so ranchers will use them.”

The Northeast Washington Wolf-Cattle Collaborative was also awarded $189,492 to monitor herds in wolf territories. The grants were announced by the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

The Legislature created the program two years ago to give “community-based” organizations a shot at preventing wolf attacks on livestock.

A year ago, the Cattle Producers submitted a plan endorsed by county sheriffs and commissioners. The Department of Fish and Wildlife, however, criticized the proposal, and the committee that reviewed the applications rejected it.

Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman Staci Lehman said Wednesday that the department welcomes help from the Cattle Producers. “Whether it’s with us or with them, as long as ranchers are working with somebody, great,” she said.

The Cattle Producers applied for $210,600 to hire conflict specialists and buy equipment, including trail cameras and horse trailers. Nielsen said he thinks the group will be able to trim its budget and still cover the four counties.

Nielsen said he anticipates conflict specialists will keep ranchers informed about wolves in their area. He also said he expects they will keep watch on depredation investigations by Fish and Wildlife.

“I think we can get ranchers to do what’s expected of them. In return, we want the department to do what’s expected of it,” he said.

The Northeast Washington Wolf-Cattle Collaborative received a similar-sized grant last year. The director, Jay Shepherd, said the group mostly employed people this summer in the Kettle River Range, a hotspot for depredations that led to the lethal removal of wolves.

“It’s a tough neighborhood to have success,” Shepherd said. “One problem with doing what you hope to do is wolves don’t do what you hope they would do.”

In the future, herd monitors may be more useful in keeping packs from developing a taste for cattle, he said.

“Once they’re habituated toward cattle, it’s hard to break,” Shepherd said.

Fish and Wildlife eventually resorted to shooting eight wolves in the OPT pack. Department Director Kelly Susewind has authorized removing the Togo pack’s two known wolves. So far, no wolves have been removed.

Shepherd, a former Fish and Wildlife biologist, said protecting livestock from wolves is “more complicated than people think.”

“Given the political climate of the state, do we have a choice but to figure it out? I’d say ‘no,'” he said. “So let’s have a concerted effort to determine what’s effective.”

A board representing conservation districts in the four counties reviewed the applications and awarded the grants.

Three other organizations applied but did not receive funding. The department distributed all the money appropriated by lawmakers, keeping $17,600 for administering the program.

 

Source https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/blackwolfpack-750×514-1-750×514-750×514-1-300×206.jpg #EndangeredSpeciesList #OpposeWelfareRanchingNotWolves #ProtectTheWolves

“Ma’iingan is our brother”: An Ojibwe way of speaking about wolves

Our Brother Wolf is no Less Sacred than

Our Brother Grizzly

This 24 page Read is available on Our website.

Peter David, a biologist who has long worked for the Ojibwe, contends that wolves have cultural
and spiritual significance “so profound that many tribal members feel a certain degree of
discomfort discussing it” (2009, p. 273). Lethal control of wolves, he writes, is particularly difficult for
many Ojibwe to contemplate, as one does not “apply the death penalty to brother wolf”.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cerulli_tovar-Wolves-are-sacredOjibwei.pdf” title=”cerulli_tovar-Wolves are sacredOjibwei”] https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/GrizzlyandWolf-300×173.jpg

NGOs that have yet to respond to Grazing Allotment Complaint Invitation

protect the wolves, grazing allotments

This Particular Invitation to sign onto Our Colville Grazing Allotment Complaint and Closure Request was emailed August 21st, 2019

As of Today September 11th, 2019  

The Following list of Organizations have not yet responded.

  1. Center For Biological Diversity
  2. Defenders of Wildlife
  3. Humane Society, Predator Defense
  4. Pacific Northwest Wolf Coalition
  5. Endangered Species Coalition
  6. Western Environmental Law Center
  7. Cascadia Wildliands
  8. California Wolf Center
  9. Project Coyote.

It is past time for All to Join as One Voice with an Organization that has tools available that none of the above listed Groups have on Their Own.

Our Research and Path is Precedent Setting, failure to respond does not shed a positive light on the desire to actually begin stopping what is happening to Your Children’s Resources.

This list will be edited with new additions or deletions from it. https://protectthewolves.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/noresponse-750×410.png #EndangeredSpeciesList #ProtectTheWolves #ProtectWolvesInWashington